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10 results for Hurricane Fran, 1996
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Record #:
3090
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Hurricane Fran's 1996 blow across the state brought not only destruction to a number of towns and cities, but also a swift response to the emergency by local governments.
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Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 46 Issue 12, Dec 1996, p1,8-9, il
Record #:
3227
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In 1996, Hurricane Fran wreaked havoc on the southern barrier islands, eroding many beach areas and destroying property. While most beaches will recover, some will require ten to fifteen years. Pre-1960s-built homes suffered the most damage.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Jan/Feb 1997, p2-7, il Periodical Website
Record #:
4179
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After Hurricane Fran ravaged the coast in 1996, the UNC Center for Urban and Regional Studies studied ways to minimize coastal storm destruction. Among the 1997 study recommendations were purchase of high hazard properties by state or local governments for use as recreation areas or wildlife refuges and limiting governmental subsidies for construction in vulnerable areas.
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Record #:
7907
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After a thirty-year lull, residents of eastern North Carolina received a grim reminder of the power of a hurricane when Fran, a category 3 storm, came ashore on September 5, 1996, at Topsail Island and drove as far inland as Raleigh. The storm was part of a one-two punch; Hurricane Bertha had struck the area two months before in July. Fran left $5 billion in damages. Green examines changes that have taken place over the last ten years, including building code updates for ocean properties, beach recovery, and new coastal insurance options.
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Record #:
3339
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In the summer of 1996, the destructive forces of hurricanes Bertha and Fran caused widespread damage to woodlands and animal habitats far inland, to the Piedmont. Nature, though, has a built-in resiliency that provides for eventual recovery.
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Record #:
27331
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Twenty years ago, Hurricane Fran was North Carolina’s most destructive storm to date. Reflecting on past storms can help prepare residents for future storms and forgetting can be costly.
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Record #:
30758
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Many of North Carolina’s historic sites saw major damage from Hurricanes Bertha on July 12 and Fran on September 5-6, 1996. While Fort Fisher saw little more than the usual amount of erosion and a sand/debris covered highway due to the newly erected riparian wall, other sites experienced a massive amount of toppled trees and damage to facilities and historic buildings. While most of the NC government offices in Raleigh were closed in the week after, NC State Historic Preservation Office personnel were working to contact preservation officials in all 54 counties in the declared disaster area.
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Record #:
30930
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Author Jay Barnes revisits hurricane Fran twenty years later. This article is composed of excerpts from Barne's 2013 book, NORTH CAROLINA'S HURICANE HISTORY. Hurricane Fran made landfall on September 5, 1996 at Bald Head Island as a category 3 hurricane.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 3, Summer 2016, p6-13, il Periodical Website
Record #:
34257
Author(s):
Abstract:
On September 5, 1996, North Carolina was hit by Hurricane Fran, the most destructive hurricane ever to strike the state. To prepare for future natural disasters, Governor James B. Hunt, Jr. issued an Executive Order establishing the North Carolina Disaster Recovery Task Force. The task force was charged with making sure resources for recovering from Hurricane Fran were used efficiently and with making recommendations for responding to future disasters.
Record #:
34254
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Personnel of many federal and state agencies were at work gathering information and assessing damage immediately after Hurricane Fran hit on September 5. This article summarizes assessments of peak streamflows in the Tar River and Neuse Basin, flood damage, water quality and fisheries conditions.