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16 results for Fishing--North Carolina, Coastal
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Record #:
14626
Author(s):
Abstract:
Big game fishing accounted for a major economic contribution to eastern North Carolina. A burgeoning market for recreational fishing trips off North Carolina's coast was born in the 1940s. Once considered a hobby, coastal populations quickly learned to tap into the activity which tourists were willing to pay for. Recreational fishing gained one million in revenue because of growing popularity during this period.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 28, Dec 1946, p3-4, 22, il
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Record #:
14733
Abstract:
More than 200,000 pounds of fish were caught in a single net off Bogue Banks - the greatest catch in the history of fishing off the North Carolina coast.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 23, Nov 1944, p1-4, 22, f
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Record #:
17746
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author delivers a person narrative of growing up in the sports fishermen world on the Outer Banks with historical background included.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 9, October 1999, p25-39, il
Record #:
24184
Author(s):
Abstract:
Marine industries in North Carolina and Virginia have suffered since 1995 as a result of competition from imports, increasing regulations, and coastal development. The author discusses how various businesses strive to keep afloat.
Record #:
24527
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author recounts his experiences fishing off the coast in North Carolina as a child. The most popular areas included Morehead City, Hatteras, and the Wilmington area.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 4, September 1977, p29-31, il
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Record #:
24539
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author highlights some of the popular fishing spots on North Carolina’s coast and discusses the fishing industry in the state.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 43 Issue 9, February 1976, p13-14, il
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Record #:
24622
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Abstract:
The first swordfish caught off the coast if North Carolina was taken in 1959. Since then, a swordfishing boom has taken place in many coastal towns, helping to boost the local economies.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 31 Issue 22, March 1964, p7-8, il
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Record #:
24647
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author highlights some of the popular fishing spots on the North Carolina coast and discusses when various seasons begin.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 22, April 1959, p11-12, il
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Record #:
24711
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author discusses the beginning of the fishing year on the coast of North Carolina, highlighting the importance of the industry to the state.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 41, March 1952, p3-5, il
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Record #:
26656
Abstract:
Croaker are popular fish in some areas of the southeast such as North Carolina, but in other areas, like Florida, they are not used as frequently for food. The best croaker fishing usually occurs in deep holes or channels one hour before a high slack tide to one hour afterwards.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 33 Issue 3, May/June 1986, p10, il
Record #:
26653
Abstract:
Sheepshead are fish often found in inshore waters, bays and sounds near jetties, pilings, bulkheads or any other hard substrate where shellfish occur. In North Carolina, sheepshead are a challenge to catch but make for delicious eating.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 33 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1986, p10, il
Record #:
10151
Author(s):
Abstract:
Earley describes a way of fishing along North Carolina's coasts that is slowly disappearing--long-haul net fishing. The technique is expensive and labor intensive and requires coordination among the boats involved. In the 1970s and 1980s, around a dozen long-haul crews worked Core Sound, but it 2007, the number has been reduced to two crews.
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Record #:
17758
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina offers world class fishing opportunities off the coast due to the influence of the passing Gulf Stream.
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Record #:
29263
Author(s):
Abstract:
In North Carolina, summer fishing is for tourists and fall is the time for fishermen’s fishing. The season usually begins with a mullet blow, a time when the fish become more active due to cooling shallow waters. Also typical of the boom in fall fishing is the well-fed king mackerel, gaining a pound per week in size.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 9, Nov 1980, p36-38, il
Record #:
30404
Author(s):
Abstract:
Late July through September have heralded a record catch for billfish along North Carolina's southeastern coast. More sportsmen are fishing off North Carolina for big game fish than ever before, dubbing the state Game Fish Junction.