NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


12 results for Stick, David
Currently viewing results 1 - 12
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
14096
Author(s):
Abstract:
For twenty-five years, Toby Tillet has been taking people back and forth across Oregon Inlet, Dare County, and he plans to continue the work for many years to come.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 17 Issue 3, June 1949, p5, 17, f
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
14101
Author(s):
Abstract:
David Stick has done considerable research work in connection with the disappearance of the colonists, and he presents his findings here.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 17 Issue 5, July 1949, p11, 20-21
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
14189
Author(s):
Abstract:
After having been kept in a more or less dormant state for sixteen years, it now looks as though the projected Hatteras National Seashore is going to be finished.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 17 Issue 39, Feb 1950, p6-7, f
Full Text:
Record #:
15244
Author(s):
Abstract:
Stick details how the famous sand dunes of Dare County were formed through the movement of drifting sand that settled against the former coastal woods. It has been discovered that these dunes also roamed, shifting down the Banks by winds and tides, while current experiments with Bermuda grass are attempting to anchor the moving sands.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 7 Issue 30, Dec 1939, p6-7, f
Full Text:
Record #:
17153
Author(s):
Abstract:
David Stick of Kill Devil Hills in Dare County describes his fifty-eight day, nine thousand miles hitch-hiking trip around the nation. In all he visited twenty-six states, Mexico, and the District of Columbia.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 6 Issue 34, Jan 1939, p1-2, 20, por
Full Text:
Record #:
17649
Author(s):
Abstract:
On September 11, 1939, a fire broke out in one of the waterfront docks behind Manteo's business district, destroying sixteen businesses and one large dwelling. The loss was estimated at $200,000, and because the buildings were wooden frame, the insurance covered only ten percent. Manteo is rebuilding, and in place of the old wooden structures, modern, brick buildings are rising.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 7 Issue 32, Jan 1940, p7, 16, il
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
17746
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author delivers a person narrative of growing up in the sports fishermen world on the Outer Banks with historical background included.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 9, October 1999, p25-39, il
Record #:
17991
Author(s):
Abstract:
The article is a critique of public libraries throughout the state and the failings of this system for those North Carolinians who are illiterate. As a member of the Governor's Commission on Library Resources, the author suggests that libraries should not just be repositories for books. The 1964 commission proposed several changes including developing a more cooperative funding scheme including local, state, and federal funds and forming a statewide Citizens Committee for Better Libraries to be represented in every county.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 34 Issue 4, Dec 1967, p5-7, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
18780
Author(s):
Abstract:
Stick discusses recent publicity surrounding the threat to Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, and what can be done to prevent loss of the landmark.
Record #:
24640
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Outer Banks is a vast embankment of sand just off shore from North Carolina that has protected the mainland from the ravages of sea but has also caused difficulty concerning navigation. Engineers and sailors alike have considered various ways of stabilizing the banks, opening inlets, and controlling flooding. This article presents some of them.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 19, February 1959, p14-15, 23, il
Full Text:
Record #:
35486
Author(s):
Abstract:
The destruction of the Outer Banks, according to the author, can be traced back to the realty development that started during the Great Depression. The destruction of the decades can be perceived in the erosion of the beach and pollution of water. Fortunately, the observation of this yield ended on a hopeful notes. The author concluded that, what human beings have done, can be undone with a combination of cooperative government programs and love for the land.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 3, May/June 1977, p34-37