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12 results for Fishing--Commercial
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Record #:
16658
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Abstract:
Leutze discusses the debate on the definition of a commercial fisherman and the restriction on the use of the funds generated by the saltwater fishing license.
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Record #:
23663
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Heidi Dunlap and partner Steve Maher run The Wild Salmon Company in Asheville. They fish for salmon in Alaska during the summer months and bring their catch to Asheville.
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Record #:
24184
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Marine industries in North Carolina and Virginia have suffered since 1995 as a result of competition from imports, increasing regulations, and coastal development. The author discusses how various businesses strive to keep afloat.
Record #:
24341
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North Carolina’s government encouraged fishermen to outfit their boats for shark fishing. Now, regulators believe shark fishing is no longer a feasible market and environmentalists claim shark populations are being overfished. Shark fishermen are struggling to bounce back from the loss of their investments in the market.
Record #:
24622
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The first swordfish caught off the coast if North Carolina was taken in 1959. Since then, a swordfishing boom has taken place in many coastal towns, helping to boost the local economies.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 31 Issue 22, March 1964, p7-8, il
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Record #:
22588
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Only 5.5% of of over 5,000 commercial fishing license holders in North Carolina are women, and although the commercial fishing industry is often seen as a male activity, women's role in sustaining fisheries and fishing communities is unparalleled in many roles.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2015, p12-17, por Periodical Website
Record #:
29895
Author(s):
Abstract:
From the 1930s, George Gray's family has run the oldest fish house in Avon. In the early years of the fishing industry, fishing was steady and so was the price, and Mr. Gray's family sold to numerous fish companies over the years. But now, fishing goes up and down, and the prices changes rapidly, especially for seasonal fish like crabs.
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Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 3, Fall 1979, p15-17, por
Record #:
29902
Abstract:
Commercial fishing has been happening on Outer Banks for generations, and long hauling is just one of many of the techniques used to bring in fish. With nets over 1500 yards long, long hauling takes long hours and hard work, and requires the cooperation of three boats to push, pull, and bail.
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Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 3, Fall 1979, p40-45, por
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Record #:
30636
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Abstract:
From Dare County to Brunswick, County, North Carolina, over 25,000 people are wholly or partly dependent on commercial fishing for their livelihood. But there are several fishermen in North Carolina who are truly unique; they are red snapper anglers. These intrepid fishermen are proving the red snapper can be caught offshore North Carolina all twelve months of the year.
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Record #:
34382
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Abstract:
Commercial fishermen have been an integral part of Hyde County’s heritage and economy. David Gibbs, a third-generation commercial fisherman, has spent the last twenty-five years crabbing, fishing, shrimping, and oystering. As Gibbs explains, with different kinds of fishing the work varies from day to day.
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Record #:
36015
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Between the Coast Guard, naval yard, and commercial fisheries work of many kinds, Mr. Robert Watson Gray had gained almost a lifetime of maritime experience. After retirement, with much of his days taken up by fishing, he showed how the lure of the open sea still reeled him in.
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Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1980, p52-59
Record #:
39995
Author(s):
Abstract:
The term shop local, usually associated with farmers’ markets, may now be applied to the growing numbers of people preferring locally harvested seafood. The sea to table movement is part of a growing trend of consuming products considered fresher, more natural, and aiding in the prevention of chronic health condition.
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