NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


19 results for Shipwrecks
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 2
Next
Record #:
422
Author(s):
Abstract:
The HOME, a celebrated New York steamship, proved to be no match for a hurricane off Ocracoke in 1837.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 60 Issue 1, June 1992, p14-16, il
Full Text:
Record #:
2326
Author(s):
Abstract:
By storm or war, 3,700 ships have gone down off the state's coast since the 1500s. Cargo from them supported many coastal villages. Even today wreck sites provide interest for divers and tourists who visit and for historians who seek to preserve them.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , May/June 1995, p10-15, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
4942
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1975, the sunken Monitor, the famous Union ship discovered in 1973, became the first National Maritime Sanctuary. In 1977, the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration (NOAA) began site explorations. The first item recovered was a brass ship's lantern. Green describes dives on the shipwreck since its discovery and underwater conditions divers had to deal with.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 2001, p23-25, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
13642
Author(s):
Abstract:
The wreck of the steamship Metropolis is a catastrophe that shook America and led to the establishment of an all-year beach patrol by the Coast Guard.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 23, Nov 1951, p34-, 23, por, f
Full Text:
Record #:
14514
Author(s):
Abstract:
Recent hurricanes brought to light for a brief period the remains of several vessels, buried in the sands for many years off the coast of North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 10, Aug 1945, p1-3, 16, f
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
15323
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Metropolis wrecked off the Currituck Lighthouse on December 29, 1877. The two-mast steamer carried 246 passengers and 102 perished in the wreck. Aboard the ship were supplies to build a railroad in Brazil. A terrible storm drove the ship onto shore not far from Currituck Lighthouse.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 5 Issue 18, Oct 1937, p3, 22, il
Full Text:
Record #:
15489
Author(s):
Abstract:
U.S.S. HURON wrecked on Nags Head's reefs in November 24, 1877. One hundred eight lives were lost during the wrecking despite efforts by Capt. B. F. Meekins, head of the Nags Head lifesaving station. The HURON was a 610 steamer commanded by Captain George P. Ryan when the ship left Hampton roads bound for Key West before a storm blew her ashore.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 24, Nov 1935, p7, il
Full Text:
Record #:
16720
Abstract:
Remains of the USS UNDERWRITER were found by individual divers in the Neuse River in June 1987. The ship sank on February 1, 1864 defending against Confederate recapture of New Bern, taken by Union forces in March 1862. Divers, in conjunction with the state, recovered a gun carriage; a significant artifact because it was the only one of its type actually used in a naval engagement in state waters.
Subject(s):
Record #:
17731
Author(s):
Abstract:
People along the coast of North Carolina take notice when the graveyard of the Atlantic dumps one of its shipwrecks on the Outer Banks beaches. Research, including a dissertation done at East Carolina University, are assessing the cultural, historical, and economic values of these beached vessels.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 2010, p24-26, f Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
31404
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many North Carolinians are concerned that proposals for granting offshore oil-drilling leases could lead to oil spills. During World War Two, oil spills along North Carolina’s shoreline were common since oil tankers were main targets by the German Navy U-boats. In the process, many tankers sank, leaving grave markers along the coast.
Record #:
34738
Abstract:
Leonard Day was a Morehead City native who enlisted with the U.S. Navy on April 9, 1917. Assigned to the USS CYCLOPS, Day worked as a 1st class fireman aboard the vessel. In February, 1918, CYCLOPS was travelling from Brazil to Virginia when it vanished off the coast. Several other North Carolinians were onboard with Day. The vessel and crew were declared missing in June, 1918 and are considered “killed in accident.”
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 21 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2005, p9-10, il, por
Record #:
35482
Author(s):
Abstract:
A victim can be the Central America, a ship that an oceanographic atlas and US Navy wreck list had tried to locate. Victim can be defined by the loss of 482 human lives. In this case, victim directly alluded to the loss of gold. Approximately $600,000 of this precious metal—in the form of coins, dust, and nuggets—was jettisoned by the crew into the sand clouded briny deep.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 3, May/June 1977, p10-13, 45, 47
Record #:
35929
Author(s):
Abstract:
What TJ Evans shared was evidence of the Banks’ long personal history and occasional weavings into the greater tapestry of American history. His stories highlighting the history of Cape Hatteras Island, its lighthouse, and the Banks’ experiences with hurricanes. As for involvement with historical events of greater reported significance, noted was the only direct contact made with the sinking Titanic, from the Cape Hatteras Wireless Station.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1973, p56-58
Record #:
35954
Author(s):
Abstract:
Remembrance of rescue from a Coast Guard boat overtaken by a hurricane was spurred by the death of Lt. Bernice Ramon Ballance. He, as much as the event, was a reminder that heroes, found during war and peace, can be located on a rescuing sea plane as much as capsized cutter. For more information about this event, refer to the book, North Carolina Hurricanes, by Charles B. Carney and Albert V. Hardy.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p59-64
Record #:
35952
Abstract:
Remnants of the ship, sunk between Hatteras Island and Ocracoke in 1913, were reputedly left along the coast. Pieces of the wreckage could also be perceived in its survivors and those left behind, like Mrs. Martha Barnett, to tell the tale.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p57