NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


12 results for Hurricanes--Outer Banks
Currently viewing results 1 - 12
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
15779
Author(s):
Abstract:
In August 2011 Hurricane Irene roared across the Outer Banks and inland areas with punishing winds and pounding rains. Latham describes the destruction in Dare County and the rest of the Outer Banks and how the coastal residents responded to the destruction.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 2011, p6-11, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
29930
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Green Island Clubhouse, located south of Hatteras Island, was a haven for fishing and hunting activities. But in 1933, a hurricane hit the Island, washing away the kitchens, knocking down the ceilings and chimneys, and emptying the cisterns.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1980, p48-51, il, por
Record #:
36025
Abstract:
Clarence Jennette’s memories recalled were of the area’s well-known 1933 and 1944 hurricanes. The Hatteras residents’ method of battening down the hatches and waiting it out—has proven to help them weather any storm.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1985, p8-9
Record #:
35925
Author(s):
Abstract:
Good weather, necessary for tourism, the Outer Banks’ major income source. Always looming, though, was the possibility of bad weather dampening the trade. Hence, they were dependent upon good weather and vulnerable when it wasn’t: lessons natives learned early in life. Fortunately, they had the wisdom of past generations’ experience to serve as a guide.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1973, p14-15
Record #:
35954
Author(s):
Abstract:
Remembrance of rescue from a Coast Guard boat overtaken by a hurricane was spurred by the death of Lt. Bernice Ramon Ballance. He, as much as the event, was a reminder that heroes, found during war and peace, can be located on a rescuing sea plane as much as capsized cutter. For more information about this event, refer to the book, North Carolina Hurricanes, by Charles B. Carney and Albert V. Hardy.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p59-64
Record #:
35952
Abstract:
Remnants of the ship, sunk between Hatteras Island and Ocracoke in 1913, were reputedly left along the coast. Pieces of the wreckage could also be perceived in its survivors and those left behind, like Mrs. Martha Barnett, to tell the tale.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p57
Record #:
35953
Author(s):
Abstract:
Accompaniment to the Martha Barnett Austin’s “Shipwreck! The George W. Wells” was this article, whose information about the sunken schooner was referenced from David Stick’s Graveyard of the Atlantic.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p58
Record #:
35993
Author(s):
Abstract:
On paper, particularly newspaper, what Captain Bernice Balance might be best known for was his bravery. This characteristic was chiefly expressed during his career in the Life Saving Service, now called the Coast Guard. The life-saving incident that made the papers was his role in the rescue of Coast guardsmen adrift after a hurricane struck the North Carolina coast in September 1944. Incidents perhaps just as worthy of print included his catch of a seventy five pound channel bass, touted as the "world's record for drum caught in the surf."
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 3, July 1976, p88-90
Record #:
36003
Author(s):
Abstract:
It had dominated short wave radio broadcasts on September 12, 1944, and still dominated the memories of many residents. Power to generate remembrance could be explained by the winds, exceeding 100 miles per hour, and 96 of the 115 homes damaged or washed off their blocks. Perhaps, though, a greater explanation can lie in no human casualties or homes badly damaged. From that, God at work in the midst of Mother Nature’s wrath was a possibility still speculated.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p16-17
Record #:
36026
Abstract:
This article, part of a series for this edition, recounted Hatteras Island’s experience with the well-known 1933 and 1944 hurricanes. What it has in common with “Storm Memories” was personal accounts, in this case of a family, the Austins, rather than an individual, Clarence Jennette.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1985, p12-13
Record #:
36028
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article, part of a series for this edition, chronicled Hatteras Island’s encounters with well-known 1933 and 1944 hurricanes. This recollection by Ernal Foster, included photos illustrating the 1933 storm’s impact, proved pictures can be worth a thousand words.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1985, p15-17
Record #:
36027
Abstract:
A resident of this town, renamed Frisco since Maggie Austin’s experience with the 1944 hurricane, recalled its terrifying impact. What hadn’t changed: the resilience residents exhibited.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1985, p14