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9 results for Radio
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Record #:
17403
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Abstract:
Communication for police, especially in dispatch scenarios, was limited until developments in radio. The first state-wide police radio channel was established on October 16, 1936 and hoped to be functional by January 1937. Costs for local police departments ranged from &50 to $125 to hook into the system, all other related costs fell on the state to build and maintain broadcasting stations.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 4 Issue 1, Oct 1936, p1-2
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Record #:
18266
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Reginald Fessenden, one of America's great inventors, spent two years on the coast of North Carolina conducting experiments with wireless. At the same time two other inventors were working nearby--the Wright brothers. However, when North Carolina approved raising $100,000 for a monument to Fessenden, hardly anyone in the state knew who he was or what he did.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 4, June 1941, p17, 24, por
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Record #:
24023
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Mountain Area Radio Reading Service provides readouts of the news to Asheville locals over the radio. This Service is particularly geared towards helping those with vision and print disabilities.
Record #:
24179
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Abstract:
Batanga.com, located in Greensboro, is a radio web site that caters to those who enjoy Latin music. The site features genres such as tango, flamenco, salsa, and even classic rock, all in Spanish. The author interviews the owners of the business to find out why they have been so successful in Greensboro.
Record #:
24210
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Abstract:
Mark Packer is a radio talk show host at WFNZ-AM in Charlotte's South End. He delivers sports news and generated an impressive following of his 'Primetime with Packman,' which has spread to ten stations across the Carolinas.
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Record #:
16121
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From 1901 to 1902, Reginald Fessenden experimented with radio near Manteo on Cobb Island. He was asked to assist the Weather Bureau with pioneering a wireless system of communication to aid in forecasting and transmitting weather data.
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Record #:
35398
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The author offered a favorable review of Digital Audio Radio Service, or Satellite Radio. Among advantages over AM/FM highlighted were the number of channels, widespread access, live broadcasts, a digital display for the song and artist, and CD-level listening quality, all at a comparatively low price.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
35922
Author(s):
Abstract:
Amateur, or ham, radio is a method of distance communication enjoyed by people of all ages and social backgrounds. To keep track of their different radio contacts, they used QSL cards, which were kept and displayed in many ways such as photo albums, picture frames, file boxes, and plastic folders.
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Record #:
36003
Author(s):
Abstract:
It had dominated short wave radio broadcasts on September 12, 1944, and still dominated the memories of many residents. Power to generate remembrance could be explained by the winds, exceeding 100 miles per hour, and 96 of the 115 homes damaged or washed off their blocks. Perhaps, though, a greater explanation can lie in no human casualties or homes badly damaged. From that, God at work in the midst of Mother Nature’s wrath was a possibility still speculated.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p16-17