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14 results for Belton, Tom
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16196
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WABPS stood for the Woman's Association for the Betterment of Public Schoolhouses was a reform organization operating in the early 20th-century. Students from the State Normal and Industrial School for Women, now the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, founded the organization to improve existing and provide new educational environments. It was an-all woman run organization and men could join but only after paying dues and with the understanding that they were not allowed to vote or make decisions within the organization.
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18384
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With the country in international conflict with Spain, President William McKinley issued a call for 125,000 volunteers to expand the small American army. Responding to this call, North Carolina formed three regiments for federal service. The newly formed Third North Carolina Volunteers provided distinctive--the regiment was made up entirely of black officers and enlisted men.
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21454
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Ferebee was born on a Davie County farm near Mocksville. After college he joined the Army Air Force before World War II began and trained as a bombardier. He flew over 60 missions over Europe and earned a reputation as one of the best bombardiers in the Air Force. He also made two friends who would be important to him later in the war--Paul Tibbets, a talented pilot, and Theodore van Kirk, a skilled navigator. In 1944 he was ordered back to the US by special request of Colonel Tibbets. On August 6, 1945, with Tibbets flying the Enola Gay, bombardier Thomas Ferebee dropped the first atomic bomb ever used in wartime on the Japanese city of Hiroshima.
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Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 13 Issue 1, Spr 2007, p10, por
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21477
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On July 25, 1950, North Korean troops invaded South Korea, starting the Korean War. Sixteen nations, including the US, committed troops to defend South Korea. Almost 800 North Carolinians were killed. One, medic PFC Bryant E. Womack of Rutherford County, was killed March 12, 1952. He was twenty years old and was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor. In May 1955, work began at Fort Bragg for a hospital to be built in his name. Womack Army Hospital is today a major army medical center and the only such facility honoring an enlisted man.
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Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 13 Issue 2, Fall 2007, p9-10
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21493
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Evelyn Whitlow was born in Leasburg, Caswell County. After high school graduation, she trained as a registered nurse, and in May 1940 entered the US Army as a nurse 2nd Lieutenant at Fort Bragg. She was in the Philippines when Japan attacked Pearl Harbor. She and other nurses earned the above title for treating soldiers and civilians as their supplies dwindled. Many nurses were successfully evacuated, but Whitlow's plane crashed and all aboard were captured. She was one of eighty-one female prisoners of war held in Manila. These women were the first female POWs in American military history. They were liberated in February 1945. Whitlow died June 3, 1994.
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Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 14 Issue 1, Spr 2008, p6, il, por
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Record #:
16111
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The Fayetteville Arsenal and Armory was one of several along the Atlantic seaboard intended to store arms for quick and systematized distribution. Such a facility was part of a growing concern for national defense following the War of 1812. Construction began in 1838 but would not be completed until 1859 due to insufficient funds and lack of skilled labor.
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16121
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From 1901 to 1902, Reginald Fessenden experimented with radio near Manteo on Cobb Island. He was asked to assist the Weather Bureau with pioneering a wireless system of communication to aid in forecasting and transmitting weather data.
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16127
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The North Carolina China Council organized a traveling exhibit entitled 'North Carolina's \"China Connection.\"' The council, with headquarters at UNC-Chapel Hill, highlighted North Carolinians' travels to China between the 1840s and 1940s.
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16157
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Women were banned from the military until President Roosevelt approved the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps bill on May 15, 1942. Westray Battle Boyce, an enlistee from Rocky Mount, became the corps First Office Candidate Class at Fort Des Moines, Iowa. She served her country in Africa and tirelessly promoted the role of women in the armed forces.
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16189
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Women served both the loyalists and the patriots during the American Revolution. Some of the famous women on the Loyalists side were native-Scotswoman Flora McDonald and Elizabeth Cornell Bayard. Margaret Sharpe, Betsy Dowdy, Mary Slocumb, and Elizabeth Maxwell Steele served the Patriots during the Revolution.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 32 Issue 1, Fall 1992, p13-17, il
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Record #:
10515
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Thomas Ferebee of Mocksville joined the Army Air Corps in 1941. During World War II he would fly sixty-four missions as a bombardier on a B-17. His most famous mission came at the end of World War II, when as bombardier on the Enola Gay, he dropped the atomic bomb on the city of Hiroshima.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 47 Issue 2, Spring 2008, p12-14, il, por
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14359
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North Carolina's Civil War soldiers carried and fought under four different kinds of flags: state, company, national, and battle flags. After the hostilities ended, many of these were brought home, while others had been captured and taken home by Northern states or the Federal Government. Many of these have now been returned. The Museum of History in Raleigh has the largest collection of Confederate flags held by any state-operated museum in the South.
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Record #:
36489
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The author uses letters from North Carolina soldiers to describe what it was like fighting on the Western Front.
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Record #:
36492
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The author talks about how the Spanish Flu affected the troops and the entire State of North Carolina in October and November 1918.
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