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7 results for Bogue Banks--History
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Record #:
3677
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Abstract:
From 1869 to 1870, David Coues was Army surgeon at Fort Macon. He spent endless hours studying the wildlife and writing about it. His efforts put Bogue Banks on the naturalist's map. Coues later became the foremost ornithologist of his time.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 1998, p24-26, il Periodical Website
Record #:
13465
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Abstract:
Increased beach traffic in North Carolina is leading to new roads, bridges, fishing piers, and general development. New roadside parks and other attractions are meant to divert beachgoers and augment local concessions.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 4, June 1952, p14-17, il
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Record #:
34501
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This article details the life of Alice Green Hoffman, an activist in the women’s suffrage movement, in the Outer Banks. Hoffman was born in New York City but moved to Carteret County in 1918. She sought to protect wildlife on her property ‘Isle of Pines’ in Bogue Banks and, following her death, the land was left to Eleanor Roosevelt, daughter-in-law of President Teddy Roosevelt. In 1956, Roosevelt’s heirs developed the land into Pine Knoll Shores.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 9 Issue 4, Fall 1993, p10-11, il
Record #:
34571
Author(s):
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A number of small villages on the outer banks were present during the 19th century including Rice Path, Yellow Hill, Bell Cove, and Bill’s Point. These communities—named for landscape features, community members, and historic events—lived an isolated existence. Their subsistence relied on local resources and many livelihoods revolved around fishing and agriculture.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 11 Issue 3, Summer 1995, p14-15
Record #:
34627
Abstract:
This article discusses daily life in Bogue Banks during the late 19th century. The author uses examples from her childhood to address local construction practices, food preparation, agriculture, and daily life. The theme of community and family is evident throughout the narrative and the author often depicts a self-reliant life on the Outer Banks. As local infrastructure improved, small communities usually gained a Church first followed by a school house. After the turn of the century, fishing became a predominant source of income in Salter Path for consumption in Morehead City. The narrative ends with a description of changing life in the 1920s.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 16 Issue 2, Summer 2000, p6-16, il, map
Record #:
34793
Author(s):
Abstract:
In early January 1918, a snow storm passed through the Outer Banks, bringing plummeting temperatures. In turn, Bogue Sound froze over for the first time in remembered history. A slab of ice three inches thick covered the water and the boats. A local resident recalled that the ice was thick enough to cross the sound over to Bogue Banks. Several families did push their skiffs across, in case of ice breakage. Another group of residents was stranded in their boat out on the frozen water. They eventually abandoned the vessel and successfully crossed the ice. While low temperatures still occur, there has not been another big freeze of Sound waters since 1918.
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Record #:
37743
Author(s):
Abstract:
Article about the new historical marker about Giovanni Da Verrazzano at Bogue Banks, and biography of Verrazzano, who arrived on the NC coast 64 years before Sir Walter Raleigh’s explorers.
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