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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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9 results for Coastal ecology
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Record #:
685
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Abstract:
Many coastal birds nest together, and protecting the places where they raise their young is the key to their survival.
Record #:
2422
Author(s):
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Nutrients from industry and farms are deluging the coastal ecosystem, producing problems like algal blooms and fish kills. N.C. Sea Grant researchers are using tools like hydrocorals and satellites to chart a course of treatment.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , July/Aug 1995, p10-13, il Periodical Website
Record #:
2806
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Abstract:
The University of North Carolina's Institute of Marine Sciences studies forces that affect the coastal environment - for example, whether nitrogen in the Neuse River comes from industrial or agricultural sources.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 12 Issue 3, Dec 1995, p8-11, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
2913
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Author and biologist Rachael Carson often visited such coastal areas as Beaufort's Town Marsh and Bird Shoal, and recorded her experiences in books, including UNDER THE SEA-WIND and THE EDGE OF THE SEA.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , May/June 1996, p20-23, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
5931
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Abstract:
Finfish and shellfish need protection for the coastal habitats that they require for shelter and food. Smith describes the six coastal fisheries habitats, what threatens them, and plans the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources is developing for their protection.
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Record #:
14493
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Whether the gigantic sand dunes of North Carolina, larges on the Eastern coast, will be forcibly dissuaded from their southward wanderings through a postwar planting project may depend upon whether the National Park Service considers them a desirable part of the natural wilderness, and also on conclusions reached from the damage done to man-made barrier dunes by the September 1944 hurricane.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 3, June 1945, p6-7, f
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Record #:
8799
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Many visitors to North Carolina's coastline exit their homes and pass through the sand dunes on their way to the beach without giving the dunes a second thought. Closer inspection would reveal life existing there, a tough life that works hard to make a living in the dunes day and night. Nickens discuses some of these creatures, including the ghost crab, sand wasp, red fox, royal tern, and Eastern glass lizard.
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Record #:
35809
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Noted first were reasons to appreciate the Coast and its waters, particularly sites that lend appeal. Land marks ranged from the well-known Outer Banks to perhaps lesser known Bird’s Island. Towns included famed Kittyhawk to the famed by relatively few Duck. As for what he saw as evidence of being taken for granted: pollution of air and water, destruction to dunes and wildlife. Out of an enduring appreciation for, and mounting concern about, he called for all North Carolinians to restore the Coast and its waters for future generations and out of a sacred duty.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979, p40-42, 56-60
Record #:
36163
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the briny deep of the Outer Banks and waterways such as streams was a diversity of tropic and cool water life. This diversity’s attribution was in part to the Labrador Current and Gulf Stream. Displaying the diversity were the ocean’s sand tiger sharks and nettle jellyfish, the river’s largemouth bass and waterdog.