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6 results for Mountain ecology
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Record #:
10067
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Sharpe discusses reasons why some mountain tops in the state from 2,000 to 6,000 feet high will not support trees.
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Record #:
23190
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Documentarian Chad Stevens discusses his documentary called 'Overburden,' which is about mountaintop coal removal and the detrimental effects mining has on the ecosystem.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 14, April 2015, p14-15, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
9632
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There are a number of treeless mountain meadows, called “balds,” scattered throughout the western North Carolina mountains. Some are covered with flowering bushes and others are grasslands. Payne discusses some of the theories about their origins.
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Record #:
2210
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Although usually less than five acres in size, mountain bogs have important environmental functions: helping to control flooding, filtering water supplies of pollutants, and providing plant and animal habitats
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Record #:
2896
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Although usually less than six acres in size, mountain bogs support an uncommon collection of plants, including lady slippers and cinnamon ferns, and animals like wood frogs and crab spiders.
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Record #:
3282
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In the southern Appalachians, there are over 200 treeless mountain balds that include two types: heath and grass. Grass balds are home to over 300 species of flowering plants.
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