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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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5 results for Medicinal plants
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Record #:
2499
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Located in Boone, Wilcox Natural Products is the country's biggest buyer and distributor of roots, herbs, and bark. Currently the company supplies 40 percent of the world market for botanical products, including goldenseal and wild cherry bark.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 53 Issue 9, Sept 1995, p12, 14, il
Record #:
9049
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Sassafras, used by Indians in teas and medicines, was one of the first goods exported to England from the American colonies. Although modern scientists say too much sassafras can be bad for the system, people who live in the mountains continue to drink it. Additionally, they make tea from cheery birch and spicewood.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 10, Mar 1979, p12-13, il
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Record #:
26126
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Medicinal chemists at UNC want to extract plant compounds that can kill cancer cells, viruses, or bacteria. Most of the compounds are ingredients in traditional Chinese remedies. Researchers believe that modernizing and scientifically testing the remedies will help legitimize traditional Chinese medicine so it can benefit more people.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 15 Issue 1, Fall 1998, p25-27, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
9630
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Many of the state's native plants have medicinal benefits and are often used to produce commercial drugs. Among them are bloodroot, yellow lady slipper, and mayapple.
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Record #:
2382
Author(s):
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From early times sassafras roots, leaves, and bark have been acclaimed for their healing properties. However, in 1960, the Food and Drug Administration ruled it a cancer causer and banned it from interstate commerce.
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