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14 results for Carolina Bays
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Record #:
2880
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Carolina bay lakes are a unique natural wonder in that they are no deeper than six feet, elliptical, and dependent on rainwater. Among the best known are Lake Phelps, Lake Mattamuskeet, and White Lake.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 63 Issue 12, May 1996, p25-27, il
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Record #:
3840
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Thousands of oval-shaped depressions, called \"Carolina Bays,\" stretch across the Coastal Plain. Some of the larger ones have served humans from 10,000 years ago to the present. White Lake is an example. Their origins have been attributed to meteorites, fish wallows, and beaver dams.
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Record #:
4816
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Stretching across the Atlantic Coastal Plain from Florida to New Jersey are around 500,000 elliptical depressions known as Carolina bays. Over half of them are found in eastern Carolina. The bays are a land feature that exist nowhere else in the world. No one knows how they were formed. Some have water; others are dry. Lake Waccamaw is the largest of the bays, being about five miles long.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 68 Issue 6, Nov 2000, p82-84, 86, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
5864
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Carolina bays, thousands of shallow, elliptical depressions in the earth's surface, stretch from Georgia northward, with most being found in the Carolinas. Some bays have water; others are dry. Brooks describes a particular bay known as Black Lake in Bladen County that was reclaimed, restored, and renamed Bay Tree Lake.
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New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 3, June/July 1973, p34-35, il
Record #:
10856
Author(s):
Abstract:
Stretching across the Atlantic Coastal Plain from Florida to New Jersey are around 500,000 elliptical depressions known as Carolina bays. Over half of them are found in eastern Carolina. Roberts discusses George Howard's theory that the bays were created by a comet striking the Great Lakes area about 13,000 years ago.
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Metro Magazine (NoCar F 264 R1 M48), Vol. 10 Issue 1, Jan 2009, p16-19, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
17010
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Although several coastal states have created inventories of their bays, North Carolina is only beginning a preliminary inventory of primary characteristics for classifying depression wetlands as bays using cartographic modeling and geographic information systems. Such systems allows for effective study of the region.
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North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 17 Issue , 2009, p5-16, bibl, f
Record #:
24054
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The Carolina bays, which include places like Lake Waccamaw and White Lake, are natural wonders of North Carolina. The author discusses the prevailing theories of these bays' origins, as well as the array of wildlife and vegetation found there.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 4, Autumn 2015, p24-29, il Periodical Website
Record #:
9540
Author(s):
Abstract:
Stretching across the Atlantic Coastal Plain from Florida to New Jersey are around 500,000 elliptical depressions known as Carolina Bays. Over half of them are found in eastern Carolina, and they are a land feature that exists nowhere else in the world. No one knows how they were formed.
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Record #:
9785
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Who gets to use the state's lands and for what purpose? For the wildlife and plants that inhabit it, who speaks for their needs? In this first of a four-part series, Earley examines critical areas where habitat is falling to development, such as the Carolina bays.
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Record #:
3668
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Carolina bays are oval-shaped depressions found in the Coastal Plain that are dependent on rainwater and are less than six feet deep. Dry in some seasons, wetland-like in others, they provide habitats for rare and not- so-rare plants and animals.
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Record #:
28395
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Natural water gathering in two newly discovered Carolina bays, designated as Oak Bay and Pine Bay was studied. These bays and the Sewee shell ring, a planned water gathering system built in the Archaic Period, provided a supply of freshwater. This study describes how hunter-gatherers utilized natural landscape features at these coastal archaeological sites.
Record #:
30074
Abstract:
This study is the first attempt to inventory and evaluate the mammals associated with pocosins and Carolina bays. During a four-year period, forty species of mammals were trapped or observed in twelve North Carolina habitat types. Fires, storms, and certain man-related disturbances seemed to be influences on mammal density and diversity in pocosin communities.
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Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 11, Oct 1985, p1-38, il, map, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
36297
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White Lake, once a popular place for showboats and waterski shows, holds an enduring place in North Carolina’s tourist industry. Asserting its value is White Lake: A Historical Tour of the Nation’s Safest Beach, written by a year-around resident, Cathy Faircloth. Asserting its value also is the population on summer weekends, reaching as high as 10,000.
Record #:
38253
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Cited as the third largest lake in North Carolina and home to endemic species, Lake Wacccamaw’s unique qualities include theories for its origins. Beliefs about the Carolina Bays’ creation range from the handiwork of meteors to the swimming patterns of its fish. As for the community surrounding the lake, Whiteville residents are also defined by the author as endemic. They thrive on small town values, such as tending to the town’s history and resisting a transformation into a tourist site.
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