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107 results for North Carolina--History, Colonial period, ca. 1600-1775
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Record #:
1453
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Abstract:
Arthur Dobbs served as royal governor of North Carolina from 1754 until his death in 1765. Block summarizes Dobbs' life and offers a portrait of his native Ireland, which the author and her husband visited in 1993.
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Record #:
1942
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Abstract:
Discovery in 1989 of a flatboat in a Trent River meander near New Bern gave insight into the building and use of an important transportation mode, the ferry in colonial North Carolina.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Oct 1991, p10-16, il, f
Record #:
1971
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Abstract:
Many unknown travelers, explorers, and artifacts from the 1500s and 1600s lie buried off the coasts of North Carolina and other coastal states. Underwater archaeology could assist in bringing information about this period to light.
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Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Oct 1992, p22-25, f
Record #:
2006
Author(s):
Abstract:
Colonial North Carolina's scattered rural population played games that were individualized or for small groups; among these were marbles, dolls, whittling, leapfrog, cards, hide-and-seek, and hopscotch.
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Record #:
2066
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Abstract:
Founded in 1726 as a business venture by Maurice Moore, Brunswick Town prospered as a sea port but declined after the American Revolution and was in ruins by 1830. Now a state historic site on the Cape Fear River, it attracts over 50,000 visitors a year.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 61 Issue 10, Mar 1994, p29-30, il
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Record #:
2193
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Abstract:
Prior to 1662 there were no accurate maps of the Carolina coast from Cape Lookout to Port Royal Sound. Six voyages of exploration between 1662 and 1667 added detailed descriptions of previously unknown areas to existing maps.
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Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 4, Oct 1994, p21-29, il, f
Record #:
2878
Author(s):
Abstract:
The first rebellious act against British rule in the state may have been carried out by nine patriots, known to history as the \"Black Boys of Cabarrus.\" They destroyed Governor William Tryon's munitions train on May 2, 1771, near Concord.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 63 Issue 12, May 1996, p16-17, il
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Record #:
3235
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Abstract:
Colonial travel in the lower Cape Fear region was by water and often slow and hazardous. As the population spread inland, a system of roads, bridges, ferries, and taverns developed. Since counties provided the upkeep, some routes were better than others.
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Record #:
3659
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During colonial times education for the majority of the state's people was largely informal and accomplished through observing family members and the community. Those who would not become farmers could be apprenticed. Only the wealthy could afford to send their children to schools.
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Record #:
3783
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Although the Church of England, or Anglican Church, was the colony's official religion, it grew slowly. Colonists were spread out, and churches were few. Because of the colony's religious tolerance, three dissenting groups developed: Quakers, Presbyterians, and Moravians.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 37 Issue 2, Spring 1998, p7,10-11, il
Record #:
4066
Abstract:
Taxation was a fact of life for the colonists as early as the 1600s. The main tax was the poll, or capitation, tax. However, as specific needs arose, taxes were levied for them. For example, in 1714-15, a tax paid for the Tuscarora War, and forts were built at Cape fear and Ocracoke with a eight-year tax levied in 1748.
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Record #:
4426
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In 1958, Brunswick Town was rediscovered and excavations began shortly thereafter. Research at the site between 1958 and 1968 contributed to Brunswick Town's becoming a State Historic Site. The authors summarize the decade's archaeological investigations, their significance, and their importance in the archaeological history of the state.
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Record #:
4556
Abstract:
In November 1775, Lord Dunmore, Virginia's last Royal Governor, planned to invade North Carolina. Capturing Portsmouth and Norfolk, he next barricaded Great Bridge on the Carolina side, blocking all shipments to the Norfolk port. A small force of Americans marched on Great Bridge. Knowing the force was outnumbered, Betsy Dowdy from Currituck Banks rode her horse Black Bess fifty miles on the night of December 10, 1775, to alert General William Skinner and his men at Hertford. Skinner's force reached Great Bridge in time to help defeat Dunmore on December 11, 1775, and end the invasion threat.
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Record #:
4784
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Englishwoman Catharine Phillips, a Quaker missionary, evangelized in the North Carolina coastal regions and as far west as Alamance County, beginning in 1753. Phillips wrote an account of her travels and work in Memories of the Life of Catharine Phillips, which was published in London in 1797.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Autumn 2000, p26-29, il Periodical Website