NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


8 results for Pirates--Beaufort
Currently viewing results 1 - 8
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
7829
Author(s):
Abstract:
Captain Horatio Sinbad, North Carolina's only officially commissioned privateer, set sail from Beaufort in 2002, bound for Jamaica to compete in the Class B race at America's Sail. He returned with a 100-pound trophy and the right to choose the final port of the next tall ships race in 2006. He chose his home port of Beaufort. Wright describes the activities of this tall ships event which runs from June 30 to July 4. Around 250,000 visitors are expected. Class A ships will dock in Morehead City. Class B ships will dock in Beaufort at the new floating docks being built as part of the $60 to $80 million Olde Beaufort Seaport, a living history maritime village that will expand the facilities of the North Carolina Maritime Museum.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 64 Issue 5, May 2006, p20-21, por
Record #:
7899
Author(s):
Abstract:
Captain Horatio Sinbad is North Carolina's only officially commissioned privateer. He dreamed of being a pirate when he saw the movie Treasure Island at the age of eight and later ran away from home at sixteen to join the crews of sailing ships in the Caribbean. He legally changed his name to Sinbad twenty-seven years ago. He built the ship he sails, the MEKA II, by hand, and it is his only home. The first Meka went down in a hurricane 100 miles off Norfolk, and Sinbad spent nine hours in the water before rescue. Sinbad is the reason the Americas' Sail 2006 is coming to the waters off Carteret County in the summer of 2006. He won a race in the Americas' Sail 2002 in the waters off Jamaica and won the right to choose the port for the next sailing competition. He chose Beaufort for his home port.
Source:
Metro Magazine (NoCar F 264 R1 M48), Vol. 7 Issue 6, June 2006, p14-17, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
34675
Author(s):
Abstract:
Drawing on oral histories passed down through his family, this author presents an alternative history of North Carolinian privateer Otway Burns. The author’s grandfather recalled that Beaufort residents were terrified of Burns during the early 19th century. Following the disappearance of Theodosia Burr’s schooner off the North Carolina coast in 1812, the crew of SNAP DRAGON, Otway Burn’s vessel, came to Beaufort wearing clothes supposedly taken from Burr. Residents believed SNAP DRAGON had attacked Burr’s vessel in an act of piracy. The author reports residents remained wary of Burns and, following his death, chose to bury Burns outside of town.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 18 Issue 2, Winter 2002, p11-14, il, por
Record #:
35509
Author(s):
Abstract:
More than the end of a man’s life happened on November 22, 1718, according to the author. With the death of Edward Teach, better known as Blackbeard, the golden age of piracy in the New World effectively came to an end. Highlighted in this chronicle were people who played an instrumental role, notably Governor Spotswood of Virginia, and the events from June through November that led to the end for this famous pirate.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 3 Issue 5, Nov/Dec 1975, p13-15
Record #:
35799
Author(s):
Abstract:
Blackbeard’s infamous reputation, gained from his pirate pursuits on the high seas, had preceded his arrival on land. At a town whose name has become intertwined with his, the shadow lengthened; a man’s name was added to his litany of victims.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1979, p37, 39-42, 67
Record #:
35958
Author(s):
Abstract:
Blackbeard’s enduring legend, well known in Beaufort, was anchored in other Eastern North Carolina towns. Connections sunk deeply in New Bern included a house, as well as anchor and manacles reportedly from a ship sunk not far from his house. As for intangible connections, there slave-owning stories possibly validated by the discovered manacles and anchor.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p39
Record #:
36218
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 2011, Blackbeard’s flagship had artifacts such as a three footed cauldron put on display at the NC Maritime Museum in Beaufort. Understanding the true measure of the treasure, though, entailed viewing how such items, sunk in the briny deep for nearly three centuries, were conserved by the QAR Conservation Lab.
Source:
Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , April/May 2015, p18-28
Record #:
36219
Author(s):
Abstract:
Edward Teach’s story is reflected in his dwellings and dealings in towns such as Beaufort and Bath. Blackbeard’s legend can be explained in exploits before and after his capture in 1718.
Source:
Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , April/May 2015, p29