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6 results for Slaves--North Carolina, Eastern
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Record #:
4737
Author(s):
Abstract:
Recently, historian David Cecelski discovered the only known copy of Allen Parker's Recollections of Slavery Times in the Illinois State Historical Library at Springfield. Parker, a slave in eastern Carolina, told his story in 1895, while living in Worcester, Massachusetts. Cecelski uses Parker's text to describe how slaves lived their daily lives.
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Record #:
12713
Author(s):
Abstract:
At the turn of the century, in \"Wootentown,\" North Carolina, former slaves gained notoriety for their brick-making abilities. Located near Washington, the village location was a primary source of excellent brick-making clay, allowing former slaves to practice their considerable skills. The methods used at that time required more supervision, yet a brickyard could be started with as little as $10,000, as compared to the $1,000,000 start-up costs for modern brickyards today.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 20, Mar 1962, p10
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Record #:
15677
Author(s):
Abstract:
Part four of Gerard's eight-part series on the Civil War is about many of the runaway slaves from the eastern portion of the state who stole away along the rivers and swamps, desperately trying to reach the ocean and the \"nautical Underground Railroad.\" Before the war, slaves fled oppressive lives for a chance of freedom in the north but during the war many runaway slaves took up the Union's fight. Taking advantage of war time chaos, runaway slaves fled to the Atlantic shore and enlisted with either the Union Army or Navy.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 3, Aug 2011, p56-58, 60, 62, 64-65, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
31197
Author(s):
Abstract:
David S. Cecelski has produced the first major study of slavery on the North Carolina coast, published in his book called, The Waterman’s Song. In addition to detailed descriptions of the places, society and working conditions that maritime African Americans encountered, Cecelski recounts stories of individuals who lived through these times. He also discusses the role of slave fishermen in developing the traditional fishing culture in coastal North Carolina.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 34 Issue 3, Mar 2002, p20-23, il, por
Record #:
33916
Author(s):
Abstract:
Advertisement by William Rouse, of Lenoir Co., NC for the capture of Cullen Medlin, white slave.
Record #:
35958
Author(s):
Abstract:
Blackbeard’s enduring legend, well known in Beaufort, was anchored in other Eastern North Carolina towns. Connections sunk deeply in New Bern included a house, as well as anchor and manacles reportedly from a ship sunk not far from his house. As for intangible connections, there slave-owning stories possibly validated by the discovered manacles and anchor.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 1975, p39