NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


6 results for Slaves' writings, American
Currently viewing results 1 - 6
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
797
Author(s):
Abstract:
East Carolina University English professor Gay Wilentz provides a brief overview of the known slave narratives of NC, discusses the traditional forms of narratives, and analyzes five major slave narratives.
Record #:
3452
Author(s):
Abstract:
The writings of three former slaves, Allen Parker's RECOLLECTIONS OF SLAVERY TIMES, William H. Robinson's FROM LOG CABIN TO PULPIT, and William H. Singleton's RECOLLECTIONS OF MY SLAVERY DAYS, portray the late antebellum period and the Civil War.
Source:
Record #:
4737
Author(s):
Abstract:
Recently, historian David Cecelski discovered the only known copy of Allen Parker's Recollections of Slavery Times in the Illinois State Historical Library at Springfield. Parker, a slave in eastern Carolina, told his story in 1895, while living in Worcester, Massachusetts. Cecelski uses Parker's text to describe how slaves lived their daily lives.
Source:
Record #:
4763
Abstract:
Born into slavery in Eastern North Carolina in 1835, William Henry Singleton later wrote of his experiences in Recollections of My Slavery Days. Co-editors and annotators David Cecelski and Katherine Mellen Charron present an abridged version of the text for Independent readers.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 17 Issue 12, Mar 2000, p14-19, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
4762
Author(s):
Abstract:
Derek Jennings discusses his first reading of William Henry Singleton's Recollections of My Slavery Days and the relevance the book has for today's generation.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 17 Issue 12, Mar 2000, p13, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
15680
Abstract:
Omar ibn Said's life was highlighted at the Cape Fear Historical Complex in Fayetteville in conjunction with the newly placed historical highway marker on Murchison Road in Fayetteville. Said, a West African Muslim brought to America in 1807, wrote his autobiography in 1831 composed entirely in Arabic.
Source:
Full Text: