NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


15 results for Conservationists
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
857
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hugh Morton is a conservationist and a photographer of Grandfather Mountain.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 60 Issue 6, Nov 1992, p30-32, por
Full Text:
Record #:
6185
Abstract:
Burke County native Eddie Bridges has been involved with the outdoors all his life. He served on the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission for twelve years and also on the Game Law Revision Committee. He has worked with Ducks Unlimited and was behind state legislation enacting the Wildlife Endowment Fund. He has received many awards, including the Chevron Conservation Award and the Governor's Award for Conservationist of the Year in 1993. This year he is one of only four nominees nationwide for the prestigious 2004 Budweiser Conservationist of the Year Award.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 35 Issue 11, Nov 2003, p11, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
7113
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the spring of 1867, after recovering from a serious eye injury, John Muir was trekking across western North Carolina. He was a young man of twenty-nine, and his great fame as a conservationist lay years ahead of him. He recorded his travel experiences across the postwar South in THOUSAND-MILE WALK TO THE GULF, published in 1916. Nickens retraces Muir's journey through what is now the Joyce Kilmer Memorial Forest.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 10, Mar 2005, p136-139, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
10803
Author(s):
Abstract:
James Vivian Whitfield, who laid the foundation for an effective program to end pollution of the state's waterways, is The State Magazine's North Carolinian of 1968. His work on behalf of the state was not as a paid employee or professional politician but as a dedicated private citizen. The award was made posthumously.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 36 Issue 16, Jan 1969, p9, 22, por
Full Text:
Record #:
26873
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sport hunting has increasingly come under attack by those who believe that it is cruel, damaging to wildlife populations, or both. Conservationists emphasize that, if we don’t slow the rate of habitat loss, none of us, whether hunter or non-hunter, will have abundant wildlife to enjoy.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 1, Jan 1982, p3, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
26933
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dr. Frederick S. Barkalow, Jr., retired zoology and forestry professor at North Carolina State University, died on June 22, 1982 of a heart attack at the Fishing School he started at Cape Hatteras. Fred was named Conservationist of the Year in 1969 and received numerous awards for his dedicated service. He was also a true sportsman who believed hunting and fishing were important wildlife management techniques.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 8, Aug 1982, p5, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
26949
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is one of the first states to establish a state league of conservation voters. They will monitor and publicize legislators’ conservation votes, and work to elect pro-environment candidates for the General Assembly. A questionnaire is being sent to all candidates for all state legislature seats to determine their priorities.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 9, Sept/Oct 1982, p14
Subject(s):
Record #:
2930
Author(s):
Abstract:
Chester W. Arnold was honored May 16, 1996, with the dedication in his name of a wildlife education center near Greensboro. One of the state's premier conservationists, he was inducted into the N.C. Wildlife Federation Hall of Fame in 1989.
Full Text:
Record #:
4601
Author(s):
Abstract:
One of the greatest and most influential conservation books ever published in the United States was published in 1949. The author was Aldo Leopold, and the book was A Sand County Almanac. Only Carson's Silent Spring and Thoreau's Walden are serious competitors. Wildlife biologists Pete Bromley and Phil Doerr discuss what Leopold's work says to citizens of North Carolina at the start of the twenty-first century.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
8233
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bolen reviews the lives and philosophies of three conservation giants whose ideas can be tied to the conservation of endangered species and help answer the question: Why should we care? The conservationists are John Muir (1838-1914); Gifford Pinchot (1865-1946); and Aldo Leopold (1887-1948).
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
31325
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fifty years ago, Hugh Hammond Bennett of Anson County began a movement that set a standard for erosion control practices and led to the creation of the United States Soil Conservation Service. Today, the nation has more than three-thousand soil conservation districts. This article provides background on Bennett and his conservation efforts.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 17 Issue 7, July 1985, p10-11, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31546
Abstract:
Women have become more prevalent in the job market, making up about forty-percent of the workforce in America. This article presents the stories of two North Carolina women who have succeeded in what was once considered male territory. Miriam G. Bailey is the District Conservationist in charge of Soil Conservation Service activities in Lee County, and Mary Garber has been a sportswriter for various North Carolina journals and newspapers since late World War Two.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 11 Issue 3, Mar 1979, p6-10, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
35697
Abstract:
Carolista Baum participated in a citizens’ drive to save Jockey Ridge and Chicamacomico Coast Guard Station. She played a pivotal role in the North Carolina Nature Conservancy and logged volunteer hours for projects such as Chapel Hill preservation. She acted as publisher for Brandon Press and Carolista Designers, producer of historical and educational coloring books. From such endeavors, Baum may be regarded as a woman worthy of remembrance.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1978, p64
Record #:
37261
Abstract:
Described was the labor of love involved in the restoration of a lathe originally owned by Charles Henry Hall. Courtesy of its passage down through the centuries by Hall’s nephew, Charles Hall Ashford, Jr., and L.R. Thomas Jr., the lathe is part of the Palace’s collection of human powered tools.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 13 Issue 1, Spring 2015, p8-11
Record #:
36218
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 2011, Blackbeard’s flagship had artifacts such as a three footed cauldron put on display at the NC Maritime Museum in Beaufort. Understanding the true measure of the treasure, though, entailed viewing how such items, sunk in the briny deep for nearly three centuries, were conserved by the QAR Conservation Lab.
Source:
Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , April/May 2015, p18-28