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4 results for Soil conservation districts
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Record #:
8415
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the November 2006 election, many voters will elect members to the non-partisan post of Soil & Water Conservation District Supervisor, a position many of them have never thought about. Every district has three elected members, two appointed members, and $4,000 in annual funding. The state has ninety-eight districts, including the nation's first--Brown Creek in Anson County. The district was home to Hugh Hammond Bennett, the \"Father of Soil Conservation.\" During the period of the Dust Bowl in the 1930s, he was the chief evangelist and architect of the soil and water conservation system. Ross discusses how the system has evolved during its seventy-year history.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 23 Issue 44, Nov 2006, p19, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
31308
Author(s):
Abstract:
Supervisors of North Carolina’s 94 Soil and Water Conservation Districts have adopted a resolution calling on Congress to keep the Soil Conservation Service (SCS) alive and functioning. The resolution was adopted in response to a proposal which would eliminate the United States Department of Agriculture agency in two phases. This article discusses arguments for and against the proposal.
Source:
Record #:
31325
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fifty years ago, Hugh Hammond Bennett of Anson County began a movement that set a standard for erosion control practices and led to the creation of the United States Soil Conservation Service. Today, the nation has more than three-thousand soil conservation districts. This article provides background on Bennett and his conservation efforts.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 17 Issue 7, July 1985, p10-11, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31586
Author(s):
Abstract:
Surface mining can create severe erosion and environmental problems. With five mining companies extracting feldspar and mica from the mountainous soil, Mitchell County sought assistance from soil conservationists to address spreading erosion and land damage. Land restoration efforts are underway and incorporating scientific techniques and materials to return the topography to a natural balance.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 9 Issue 1, Jan 1977, p16-17, il, por Periodical Website