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11 results for Fossils
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Record #:
1683
Abstract:
Whether alone or with an expedition, professional or amateur, fossil hunters will find North Carolina's Coastal Plain a natural museum of fossils ranging from a few thousand to eighty million years old.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , May/June 1994, p11-17, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
1686
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Using a copy of the North Carolina Geological Survey's \"Fossil Collecting in North Carolina,\" the author visits various fossil sites in the state and reports her findings.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , May/June 1994, p18-20, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7369
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Under the soil of North Carolina lies a treasure trove of amazing and ancient fossils. The state's oldest fossil, the pteridinium, dates from 550 million years ago and was found in Stanly County. Fossils are found in the state from the Appalachian Mountains to the Atlantic Ocean shoreline. Marine fossils are found east of I-95, with the town of Aurora being a treasure trove for shark teeth and other marine life. Dinosaurs are found only in two areas in the southeastern part of the state.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 4, Sept 2005, p94-96, 98-99, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7634
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In 1993, fossil hunter Mike Hammer excavated the remains of a Thescelosaurus in South Dakota. The dinosaur was named Willo after the wife of the property owner. The North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences purchased the skeleton in 1996 and brought it to Raleigh. Willo is displayed in its original posture, still embedded in the sandstone in which it rested for millions of years. What makes this dinosaur unique is that the specimen contains a fossilized heart.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 9, Feb 2006, p112-115, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
9388
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Pete Harmatuk has amassed thousands of prehistoric fossils from scouring the beds of the Neuse River. Harmatuk has developed a regular voluntary working relationship with the Smithsonian and freely donates many of his finds to the museum.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 9, Feb 1975, p13, 32, il, por
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Record #:
9947
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Officials with the Pomona Pipe Products Division of the Pomona Corporation have donated fossils found at their Gulf, NC clay mine to the American Museum of Natural History, including one three-eyed dicynodont (Placerias gigas) previously unknown east of Texas and Arizona. Other fossils found at the Chatham County site include a cousin of Tyrannosaurus Rex and Phytosaurs, ancestors of the crocodile.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 40 Issue 16, Feb 1973, p20, il
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Record #:
24504
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Fossil hunting is popular in Eastern North Carolina; many participants find the remains of sea creatures of the prehistoric sea that once covered the area. This article discusses the best places for fossil hunting and how to identify finds.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 10, March 1978, p16-18, il
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Record #:
1485
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Dinosaur fossils have been discovered along the banks of the Cape Fear River. Lee discusses his lifelong interest in the creatures and relates information about current theories concerning dinosaurs in North Carolina and throughout North America.
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Record #:
31366
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In the search for oil across the country, people have come across shell-encrusted rocks in unexpected regions. Evidence of North Carolina's development over time is seen in the geological history and fossils found throughout the state.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 22 Issue 8, January 1965, p16-17, 29, il, map
Record #:
37316
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The focal point on Main Street for four decades has become the main attraction anew through additions to its facility, in time for the annual fossil festival. In its buildings are the gift shop and learning center. Outside are mounds for intrepid fossil hunters. The boon for the museum and Aurora year around: visitors from all fifty states, as well as faraway countries and continents.
Record #:
36194
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Abstract:
DE Powder is the shortened version of diatomaceous earth, a recommended type of fertilizer. It, as fossilized remains, prove that usefulness can long outlive lifespan.
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