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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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11 results for Dinosaurs
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Record #:
4552
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For those who enjoy taking a step back through time, the new North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences in Raleigh is a treasure trove of fossils collected along the North Carolina coast, coastal plain, and Piedmont. Included in the collection are a rare 500-million-year-old Pteridinum carolinaense, one of only seven found worldwide and the only one on exhibit; a 110-million-year-old dinosaur; and a rare right whale.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2000, p26-27, il Periodical Website
Record #:
7634
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In 1993, fossil hunter Mike Hammer excavated the remains of a Thescelosaurus in South Dakota. The dinosaur was named Willo after the wife of the property owner. The North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences purchased the skeleton in 1996 and brought it to Raleigh. Willo is displayed in its original posture, still embedded in the sandstone in which it rested for millions of years. What makes this dinosaur unique is that the specimen contains a fossilized heart.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 9, Feb 2006, p112-115, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
22407
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In John Payne's studio in the Asheville River District, art, metal and skill combine to bring life-size dinosaurs and prehistoric birds to life. The sculptures are supported and moved by pulleys and cables much like a marionette would be. His collection has about fourteen animals at the moment. Museums lease his skeletons and put them on three month displays. This exhibit \"Natural History Machines\" has appeared in museums all over the nation.
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Record #:
10005
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Findings of isolated and fragmentary bones in counties, including Sampson and Bladen, provide information on dinosaurs that once roamed what is now North Carolina.
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Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 2, Nov 1979, p1-28, il, map, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
1485
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Dinosaur fossils have been discovered along the banks of the Cape Fear River. Lee discusses his lifelong interest in the creatures and relates information about current theories concerning dinosaurs in North Carolina and throughout North America.
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Record #:
27003
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A new exhibit, Dinosaur Art: The Dinosaur Show, is at the North Carolina Museum of Life and Science in Durham. The show features a variety of drawings, murals and sculptures, and is also a cultural symbol of how humans are connected to dinosaurs.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Jan 12-25 1989, p7-10, il Periodical Website
Record #:
35346
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What captured paleontologist David Button’s attention about dinosaurs’ diet was how they adapted to the more difficult to digest plants. Bodily features aiding in this evolutionary trend was the cranium and mandible. Dentition was another anatomical aspect noted by the author.
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Record #:
35384
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Examples of Dino bling, according to new research from the NC Museum of Natural Sciences, were the bony crests, horns, and knobs that may have served mating, territory, or defense purposes. Speculated also, according to author Tracey Peake, was a correlation between the shrinking bodies of dinosaurs and the disappearance of crests, horns, and knobs in favor of feathers.
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Record #:
35388
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Human’s experience of our galaxy, in terms of extreme weather such as tornadoes and heavenly bodies such as stars, was featured in two of the articles part of this collection. Topics covered in the remaining trio were related to creatures inhabiting what lies below the heavens. One, by Lindsay Zanno, discussed how a bird’s skull lent a special sort of realism to a production of Anton Chekov’s The Seagull. Another revealed new morphological data issued from the study of a rare dinosaur, therizinosaur. The last was a dinosaur lecture series held at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, one of the lecturers being Dr. Mary Schweitzer.
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Record #:
35389
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This article, a companion to “What a Croc: Introducing the Carolina Butcher,” discussed the fossilized remains of a dinosaur that existed in NC at the same time as the Carolina Butcher. Included in the article was the number of remains, unique anatomical features, and how Aetosaurs came to be the ancestor to the crocodile.
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Record #:
35437
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According to Tracey Peake, what made the tail in the ankylosaur’s tale noteworthy were these speculations: its tail club construction; and which part of the tail club’s anatomy developed first.
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