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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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39 results for North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences (Raleigh)
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Record #:
24843
Abstract:
While many specimens are kept at the Museum of Natural Sciences in Raleigh, this swordfish bill is a mystery when it comes to its origins. While museum staff know the identity of the immediate donors of the swordfish bill, its provenance remains unknown.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 24 Issue 1, Winter 2016, p11, il
Record #:
34541
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Abstract:
The North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences is involved with several different research projects around the state. Bird banding, bird counting by identifying songs, nest monitoring, and territory mapping are among the ongoing projects that are conducted with the help of North Carolina State University students. The techniques will help in another collaborative project investing the effect of forested corridors on bird species.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 6 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1998, p8-9, il, f
Record #:
34539
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Abstract:
The North Carolina State Museum of Natural Sciences has developed a new program called Project Chimney Swift. With their help, students at a local middle school began observing the behavior of chimney swift birds and even installed an experimental nesting tower at the museum. They hope this will encourage swift habitat preservation and add to what very little is known about these birds.
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Record #:
34540
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Abstract:
The North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences has spent over 100 years collecting bird specimens from not only native species, but from all over the world. The collection boasts over 13,000 prepared bird specimens. The new director continues to collect specimens and arrange for them to be easily accessible to other researchers.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 6 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1998, p4-5, il, por
Record #:
34542
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Abstract:
The Living Conservatory at the Museum of Natural Sciences has opened a new exhibit for tropical species. Live animals will be housed in the conservatory, and minimal barriers will be between them and visitors that walk through the conservatory. The conservatory will showcase tropical birds, butterflies, amphibians, reptiles, plants, and more.
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Record #:
34559
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Abstract:
The Junior Curator position at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences helps students between grades 7 and 12 to learn about what it takes to work with live animals at the museum. This article focuses on high school senior Elizabeth Jones, who started as a seventh grader in the program. The Junior Curator position allows students to interact with animals, lead education and outreach programs, and hone their skills to become a leader in the curator circuit.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 9 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 2001, p9-11, il, por
Record #:
34556
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Abstract:
New undertakings at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences puts the spotlight on paleontology. The museum’s collection has grown, including fossils from species native to the region as well as those from around the world. Working with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill as opened up the possibility of further collaboration in order to ensure research that highlights native prehistoric species.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Fall/Winter 1998, p2-7, il, por, map
Record #:
34558
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Abstract:
In North Carolina, it has become difficult to protect species that are disappearing from the state. Protection plans can include listing the species as endangered or otherwise, purchasing or creating easements for habitat lands, and collecting species for museums and conservancies. Examples of many different species and their rehabilitation plans outline how strategies must sometimes be diverse.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 9 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 2001, p16-19, il, por
Record #:
34557
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Abstract:
Using volunteers to search for prehistoric North Carolina fossils has been a valuable tactic used by the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences’ Fossil Lab. Field workers spend hours digging through the mud for small fossil finds, while other volunteers spend time curating the finds in the lab.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Fall/Winter 1998, p8-9, il, por
Record #:
34570
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Abstract:
The North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences serves a vast array of citizens in their outreach and education programs. Senior centers, Scout organizations, and school groups are among the groups that benefit from these programs. The museum has also become fluid in adjusting the programs to help incorporate better teaching styles for deaf, blind, bilingual, and distance learning patrons.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Fall/Win 2001, p16-19, il, por
Record #:
34567
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Abstract:
The North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences teamed up with students at Broughton High School in Raleigh to create a new program designed to help students move beyond their normal biology course. The program allows students to come to the museum every other day, assist with education and outreach, and conserve and inventory specimens.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 9 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 2001, p14-17, il, por
Record #:
34572
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Abstract:
The Swainson’s warbler, popular in the bottomland hardwood swamps of the Coastal Plain of North Carolina, has been researched and watched by the museum staff. By banding the birds and watching them during field excursions, researchers are able to track them, determine nesting and breeding patterns, and overall behavior of the birds.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Fall/Win 2001, p20-23, il, por
Record #:
34578
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Abstract:
With new technology becoming more easily accessible and cost-effective, the museum has begun incorporating different techniques to study animals in the wild. The Southern Hognose snake in Sandhills and the Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers in the Appalachian mountain range are two species that have been studied using technological advancements. These approaches have already led to new observations regarding these species.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 13 Issue 1, Spring 2005, p2-5, il, por
Record #:
34576
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Abstract:
In an effort to create more public outreach programs, the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences has created Outreach North Carolina. With the help of federal grant money, Outreach North Carolina has brought environmental education programs to ten underserved counties that have a large amount of natural resources. Five different programs catering to the public, children, and Spanish-speaking communities are now in effect.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 12 Issue 2, Sum 2004, p11-14
Record #:
34581
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Abstract:
North Carolina State University Libraries is teaming up with paleobotanist Elisabeth Wheeler in order to catalog thousands of species of wood. The collection, “Inside Wood”, will be available on the free public database, and showcase thousands of samples from different trees around the world. Wheeler has also donated her personal collection of 25,000 samples to the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences.
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