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7 results for Endangered species--Research
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Record #:
23919
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Abstract:
The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission's mussel breeding program increases the number of fresh water mussels in the state. Researchers study the mussels' behaviors and evaluate the effects of natural and human activity on this endangered population.
Record #:
25874
Author(s):
Abstract:
Geographer Aaron Moody and his doctoral student Anne Trainor are studying rare and endangered species at Fort Bragg near Fayetteville, North Carolina. They focus on species dispersal to learn how populations interact, and how new populations form as species move to new breeding sites.
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Record #:
9461
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Abstract:
The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission has invited biologists with expertise on various endangered species to submit study proposals aimed at determining the status and distribution of such species in North Carolina. The particular species are the red-cockaded woodpecker, American alligator, brown pelican, peregrine falcon, bald eagle, eastern cougar, Indiana and gray bats, and the Florida manatee.
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Record #:
9545
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Abstract:
The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission received a grant of over $500,000 from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for the study of the state's endangered species. Alligators, brown pelicans, red-cockaded woodpeckers, and Neuse River water dogs are just a few of the animals the Commission will study.
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Record #:
9865
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Abstract:
Some of North Carolina's wildlife species, including peregrine falcons, alligators, and spiny mussels, are considered endangered. Alderman reports on a number of restoration studies that are being conducted and the results being obtained.
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Record #:
31603
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Abstract:
If proper steps are not taken to help North Carolina’s endangered wildlife, some or all of the state’s fifteen threatened species may become extinct. Some of North Carolina’s most endangered species are the ivory-billed woodpecker and eastern cougar. Curtis Wooten of the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission discusses various threats to wildlife, and ways the commission is raising money to fund research.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 9 Issue 9, Sept 1977, p20-21, il Periodical Website
Record #:
34558
Author(s):
Abstract:
In North Carolina, it has become difficult to protect species that are disappearing from the state. Protection plans can include listing the species as endangered or otherwise, purchasing or creating easements for habitat lands, and collecting species for museums and conservancies. Examples of many different species and their rehabilitation plans outline how strategies must sometimes be diverse.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 9 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 2001, p16-19, il, por