NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


9 results for Bladen County--History
Currently viewing results 1 - 9
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
12793
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bladen County originally existed as one county prior to be divided into fifty-five, and is a popular lake region resulting from a meteor shower some 100,000 years ago. Encompassing 879 square miles, Bladen County is home to the Cape Fear, Black and South Rivers, and lies in the Sandhills Coastal Plain. Established in 1734, Bladen was settled by the Moores and eventually, the Scots. Cited in Bartram's Travels, written in 1778, residents of Bladen have enjoyed a long history within the state. Industries of this county have changed over time but include tar, turpentine, the steamboat age, agriculture, and forestry.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 28 Issue 2, June 1960, p10-11, 23, 26, 28, il, map
Full Text:
Record #:
12796
Abstract:
Including short histories of the small towns that comprise Bladen County, this article includes details concerning Elizabethtown, Dublin, Tar Heel, Bladenboro, White Oak, and Carrier's Creek-Kelly.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 28 Issue 2, June 1960, p17-18, il
Full Text:
Record #:
14957
Abstract:
The mother of 55 other counties, Bladen County was the scene of the Battle of Elizabethtown and is the location of many historic homes.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 23, Nov 1942, p1-3, 19-21, f
Full Text:
Record #:
24558
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Elwell Ferry is one of the last inland river ferries in North Carolina and is located between state highways 53 and 87 in Bladen County and crosses the Cape Fear River. The history of the ferry is presented in this article.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 39 Issue 16, January 1972, p6-7, il
Full Text:
Record #:
22379
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lieutenant Colonel Wilson Webster was a regimental commander in the English Army of Lord Cornwallis. Webster was wounded at the Battle of Guilford Court House and was evacuated toward Wilmington. Taking ill on route he spent his last days at the Bellefort plantation in Bladen County belonging to the patriot leader Hugh Waddell. The disposition of his remains is the subject of some dispute.
Full Text:
Record #:
30913
Author(s):
Abstract:
A pen used in the signing of North Carolina's Constitution was returned from a homestead near Bangor, Maine. The pen, owned and used by Fred F. French of Bladen County, was found during a renovation of the Maine homestead and returned by the town manager of Lincoln, Maine.
Source:
Record #:
34557
Author(s):
Abstract:
Using volunteers to search for prehistoric North Carolina fossils has been a valuable tactic used by the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences’ Fossil Lab. Field workers spend hours digging through the mud for small fossil finds, while other volunteers spend time curating the finds in the lab.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Fall/Winter 1998, p8-9, il, por
Record #:
34573
Author(s):
Abstract:
With the arrival of a newly discovered fossil of a bus-sized prehistoric crocodile, the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences discusses its own native crocodile. Deinosuchus, discovered in 1858, is a prehistoric crocodile that is commonly found throughout southeast North America. Paleontologists believe that these were once as common in North Carolina as alligators are in Florida now.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 11 Issue 1, Spring 2003, p2-4, il
Record #:
36297
Author(s):
Abstract:
White Lake, once a popular place for showboats and waterski shows, holds an enduring place in North Carolina’s tourist industry. Asserting its value is White Lake: A Historical Tour of the Nation’s Safest Beach, written by a year-around resident, Cathy Faircloth. Asserting its value also is the population on summer weekends, reaching as high as 10,000.