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18 results for Ferries
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Record #:
174
Abstract:
North Carolina has three remaining two-car ferries: Sans Souci Ferry, the ferry at Elwell-Carvers Creek, and Parkers Ferry.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 12, May 1992, p36-39, il
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Record #:
1942
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Discovery in 1989 of a flatboat in a Trent River meander near New Bern gave insight into the building and use of an important transportation mode, the ferry in colonial North Carolina.
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Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Oct 1991, p10-16, il, f
Record #:
2427
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The state has the nation's second-largest ferry system, next to Washington state. For tourists who want to sail and sightsee, a three-day trip along the Outer Banks incorporates ferry riding and car travel, with stops at island towns, like Ocracoke.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 63 Issue 3, Aug 1995, p16-20, il
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Record #:
4729
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Next to Washington state, North Carolina has the nation's second-largest ferry system, with twenty-four ferries operating year-round. Besides transporting two million passengers yearly, the ferry system is a lifeline for many communities. In emergencies, ferries assist in hurricane evacuation and also aid in water rescues. Soon selected ferries will become science labs, carrying automated devices to monitor such data as salinity, temperature, oxygen levels, and nutrients in coastal waters.
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Record #:
5033
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North Carolina's state-owned ferry fleet ranks second to the state of Washington, the nation's largest. Twenty-three vessels sail seven routes year-round, some across rivers, others across sounds. The ferries transport over a million vehicles and 2.5 million passengers yearly.
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Record #:
6711
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North Carolina's state-owned ferry fleet ranks second to the state of Washington's, the nation's largest. Twenty-three vessels sail seven routes year-round, some across rivers, others across sounds. A unique feature of the ferries is that each one is emblazoned with the colors and logos or mascots of the sixteen schools within the University of North Carolina System, and other private state universities and colleges.
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Record #:
7555
Abstract:
Before North Carolina began providing ferryboat service, residents of Hatteras Island depended on local ferryboat captains to transport them to the mainland or others islands of the Outer Banks. O'Neal and Tiedt discuss these early ferries and their captains, including Frazier Peele.
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Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p6-12, il, por
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Record #:
7928
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The state operates one of the largest ferry systems in the country. Currently there are seven routes operating with twenty-three ferries and over four hundred employees. The system is second only to the state of Washington's twenty-eight ferry system. An eighth route from Corolla to Currituck is in the planning stages. State ferries carry 2.5 million riders and over one million vehicles in a typical year.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 2, July 2006, p176-178, 180-181, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
10904
Abstract:
The North Carolina Highway Department operates six ferries. One crosses a river and five cross ocean sounds. Sixteen boats travel the six routes. The longest route is the 22-mile run between Cedar Island and Ocracoke. Approximately 500 employees maintain the fleet.
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Record #:
11124
Abstract:
Raymond S. Dossett Jr.'s position with the North Carolina State Highway Commission is probably the only one of its kind in the country. He holds the position of Highway Marine Engineer. In this capacity he is involved in creating and proposing designs for all of North Carolina's floating equipment, especially ferries.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 30 Issue 7, July 1972, p41, 98-100, il, por
Record #:
11712
Abstract:
In 1924, a private ferry service started by Captain Jack Nelson and based out of Oregon Inlet North Carolina, began transporting vehicles to the Outer Banks. Purchased by the state in 1950 and enhanced with ex-Navy landing craft to accommodate increasing demand, the ferry soon became inadequate. Replaced by the Bonner Bridge in 1964, the initial ferry route in North Carolina inspired the acquisition of additional state watercraft as well as new ports and service routes along the waterways of coastal North Carolina. \r\n\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 32 Issue 19, Feb 1965, p9-10, il
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Record #:
12730
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The State of North Carolina now operates a ferry service between Atlantic and Ocracoke, reminding residents of a time almost sixty years ago when the eastern part of the state was better served by water transportation. Although the boat line has declined with the regular trade, several Washington men assure residents better boat service will resume in the near future. The new ferry reminds residents of bygone days when first-class steamboats of the Dominion line made the voyage to Ocracoke.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 13, Nov 1961, p9-10, il, por
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Record #:
14096
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For twenty-five years, Toby Tillet has been taking people back and forth across Oregon Inlet, Dare County, and he plans to continue the work for many years to come.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 17 Issue 3, June 1949, p5, 17, f
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Record #:
24558
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The Elwell Ferry is one of the last inland river ferries in North Carolina and is located between state highways 53 and 87 in Bladen County and crosses the Cape Fear River. The history of the ferry is presented in this article.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 39 Issue 16, January 1972, p6-7, il
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Record #:
6048
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Before the bridges spanned the state's rivers and creeks, ferries transported people, animals, and various cargoes across waterways. It is believed the Quakers owned and operated the first ferry in 1700 in the Albemarle Sound area. Early ferries were private enterprises, and it was not until 1741 that the first free ferry was established. Once numerous, only ten ferries are in use today, seven along the coast and three on inland waterways.
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