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8 results for Minerals
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Record #:
3841
Author(s):
Abstract:
Over 300 minerals, including rubies and emeralds, are found in the state. Four museums in Western North Carolina display samples of this mineral wealth: Colburn Gem and Mineral Museum (Asheville); Museum of North Carolina Minerals (Spruce Pine); The Schiele Museum (Gastonia); and The Nature Museum at Grandfather Mountain (Linville).
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Record #:
7304
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has a rich history in minerals and gems, with more than three hundred kinds of minerals and gemstones scattered through three geographic regions. It is the only state in the nation in which all four of the major gems--diamonds, emeralds, rubies, and sapphires--have been found. The first gold rush in the country began in Cabarrus County in 1799. The largest emerald ever discovered in North America was found in western North Carolina in 1984, and gold mined from the same region supplied the U.S. Mint in Charlotte from 1837 to 1861.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 37 Issue 4, Apr 2005, p14-15, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
10379
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article discusses the presence of sapphire sources in Jackson and Macon Counties. Locals found the stones in abundance during farming, but the actual discovery waited until late in the 1850s. This region has provided large minerals to major science museums throughout the U.S.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 34 Issue 7, Sept 1966, p10
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Record #:
11459
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has a rich history in minerals and gems. The first systematic gem mining began in 1871. Among the areas where gems are found are Macon County (rubies), Mitchell and Alexander Counties (emeralds), and Cleveland and Yancey Counties (beryl). It was at Franklin in Macon County that the famous green sapphire was found. It is considered the finest in the world and is known as the Oriental Emerald.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 1 Issue 29, Dec 1933, p16, 24
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Record #:
13110
Abstract:
Under development by Appalachian Sulphides, Inc., North Carolina's first major copper mine since the late-1800s is underway. Gathering ores from shafts 30-90 feet deep, miners harvest chalcocite, averaging 20% copper content.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 24 Issue 24, Apr 1957, p16, 28, il
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Record #:
13662
Abstract:
The unusual geological structure of Cabarrus County puzzles the state's geologists.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 27, Dec 1951, p12, map
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Record #:
24701
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Over the years, many minerals have been discovered in the Toe River Valley. Recently, mica and feldspar have been the focus of mining activities in the area. The history and industry of mining in Toe River are discussed here.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 2, June 1952, p12-13, il
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Record #:
34575
Author(s):
Abstract:
In an exhibit at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, the diverse geology of the state is explored. North Carolina is the only state to produce all four major gems. Emeralds, sapphires, hiddenite, rubies, space rocks and more are all on display at the museum in the Treasures Unearthed exhibit.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 12 Issue 2, Sum 2004, p2-6, il