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12 results for Birds--Research
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Record #:
20953
Author(s):
Abstract:
Martin explains how digitized maps are helping scientists to research nesting habits and migrations of birds, like the tree swallow, brown pelican, and yellow-bellied sapsucker. Documentation at one time was limited to researchers, but with the coming of the Internet, such digitized maps and information are readily available to the general public and school systems for study.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 11 Issue 2, Sum 2003, p2-5, il, map
Record #:
26121
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jordan Price is a behavioral ecologist finishing his doctoral degree at UNC. For his dissertation, he spent the last five years studying the stripe-backed wren, a small bird indigenous to South America, to see how these birds interact and communicate. He discovered that the birds are much more vocally oriented than humans.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 15 Issue 1, Fall 1998, p7-9, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
30029
Abstract:
The soft-plumaged petrel and related species (Pterodroma spp.) remain one of the most poorly known seabird taxa in the Atlantic Ocean. Study observations of petrels off North Carolina and other eastern states reveal the pelagic seabird to be accompanying flocks of mixed bird species during offshore migrations.
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Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 18, June 1993, p115-123, il, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
30028
Author(s):
Abstract:
The tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor) has expanded its range throughout North Carolina and the southeast, despite its reputation has a generally sporadic or irregular breeder. Research shows that land clearing, impoundments and other land use patterns, the reintroduction of beavers, and the use of bluebird boxes by swallows as nest sites appear to have facilitated the expansion.
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Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 18, June 1993, p103-113, map, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
30050
Abstract:
This study investigated the species composition of land-based birds at sea during migration. Observations from 1975 to 1986 documented ninety-six species from the offshore waters of North and South Carolina. The results offer evidence for offshore movements by groups of birds other than nocturnal migrants, and suggest temporal changes in flock composition.
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Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 15, Jan 1989, p111-121, il, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
30059
Abstract:
This study examined core body temperatures of twenty-three species of sea birds collected off the North Carolina coast between 1977 and 1982. Results indicate no differences between body temperatures of foraging and non-incubating sea birds at the nesting colonies.
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Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 12, Sept 1986, p13-18, il, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
30077
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Abstract:
This study examined thermal stress among eleven species of Procellariiform seabirds taken off the North Carolina coast. All species possessed well-developed rete mirabile ophthalmicums and intercarotid anastomoses, both playing a role in regulating blood flow and brain temperatures during heat stress.
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Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 11, Oct 1985, p81-86, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
30124
Abstract:
This study examined eighty-five sea birds for the presence of parasitic worms (helminths) between May 1977 and September 1979. The birds were collected off Oregon Inlet, North Carolina, and represented the orders Procellariiformes, Pelecaniformes, and Charadriiformes. Feeding habits of the host birds were directly reflected by their helminth fauna.
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Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 7, July 1982, p61-68, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
34398
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Abstract:
Biologist Susan Campbell has been banding and studying ruby-throated hummingbirds in North Carolina for over twenty years. Her research has shown that these hummingbirds usually return to the same location every spring. More and more hummingbirds have been found overwintering along the coast, especially in the Outer Banks, due to warmer climate and plentiful food.
Record #:
34541
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences is involved with several different research projects around the state. Bird banding, bird counting by identifying songs, nest monitoring, and territory mapping are among the ongoing projects that are conducted with the help of North Carolina State University students. The techniques will help in another collaborative project investing the effect of forested corridors on bird species.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 6 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1998, p8-9, il, f
Record #:
35396
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tools for discovering the migration patterns of egrets included a solar powered GPS and seven of the species. The greatest contribution for the study, though, came from the unique migratory story each bird had to tell in this tale.
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Record #:
35395
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tools for discovering the migration patterns of egrets included a solar powered GPS and seven of the species. The greatest contribution for the study, though, came from the unique migratory story each bird had to tell in this tale.
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