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12 results for House, Catherine
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4650
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Beginning as a simple instrument brought from Africa to America by slaves, the banjo developed into one of the nation's most popular musical instruments. House discusses the history of the banjo and the research of Philip Gura in preparing his book, American Instrument: The Banjo in the Nineteenth Century.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 16 Issue 1, Fall 1999, p4-7, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7249
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Many pitcher plant populations have been seriously depleted through mass collecting and a loss of their natural habitats. Development, agriculture, and tree farming are factors in habitat destruction. Depending on the taxonomy used, there are seven to nine species of the plants in the wild. In North Carolina, pitcher plants grow mostly in the coastal plain. Rob Gardner, curator of native plants at the North Carolina Botanical Garden, is interested in the conservation of native plants, which is one of the main missions of the garden. To help the wild plants survive, Gardner, along with Larry Mellichamp, director of the UNC-Charlotte Botanic Garden, is working to produce hybrids of the pitcher plant.
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Record #:
26033
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Karla Rosenberg focused her senior honors thesis on the impact of Latino immigration on a native black community. She interviewed blacks and Latinos about their community, work, and fair wages. There was no hostility between communities regarding jobs, but competition existed among those without education and high-tech skills.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 19 Issue 1, Fall 2002, p18-19, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26059
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Mel Levine is a professor of pediatrics and director of the Clinical Center for the Study of Development and Learning. Levine created observation tools to help teachers identify where a child is having difficulties and to measure mental processes. To Levine, the most important tactic is strengthening strengths, focusing on children’s passions.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 18 Issue 1, Fall 2001, p4-6, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26061
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James Raleigh, a professor of radiation oncology and toxicology, invented the hypoxia marker to detect cells lacking oxygen. Hypoxia is indicated by special antibodies that Raleigh developed, which appears green in a photomicrograph. Raleigh and other researchers are learning that hypoxia plays a role in many diseases and processes in the body other than cancer.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 18 Issue 1, Fall 2001, p14-16, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26075
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Karyn Traut, a playwright and adjunct assistant professor of social medicine, researched descendants of Thomas Jefferson for a play she wanted to write. It was unclear whether Thomas Jefferson fathered a child with his slave Sally Hemings, or if the father was his brother, Randolph. After consulting numerous Jefferson scholars, the legitimate father remains unknown.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 18 Issue 3, Spring 2002, p18-20, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26072
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Scott Madry is an anthropologist known for his ability to use geographical information systems (GIS). He has created GIS maps for archaeologists, primatologists, and the National Geographic Society. For his latest project, Madry is working with North Carolina Department of Transportation to computerize every archeological site in North Carolina.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 18 Issue 3, Spring 2002, p4-6, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26104
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Julian Rosenman, professor of radiation oncology who specializes in lung cancer, is interested in making radiation doses more accurate and faster to calculate. Rosenman was previously a physicist and has discovered a way to break radiation beams into hundreds of little beamlets.
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26101
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Bobbi Owen, professor of dramatic art, designs costumes for theatrical productions. For each production, she starts researching months in advance to find out how to portray the cast of characters.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 17 Issue 3, Spring 2001, p16, il, por Periodical Website
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26121
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Jordan Price is a behavioral ecologist finishing his doctoral degree at UNC. For his dissertation, he spent the last five years studying the stripe-backed wren, a small bird indigenous to South America, to see how these birds interact and communicate. He discovered that the birds are much more vocally oriented than humans.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 15 Issue 1, Fall 1998, p7-9, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26140
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Marine scientists are studying small marine animals, known as hydroids, off North Carolina’s coast. They discovered hydroids have very strong UV-absorbing compounds that could possibly be used in sunscreen products.
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Record #:
26161
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UNC researchers are trying to make children’s lives better. Child development researchers are studying the quality of day-care centers, and the impacts of visual impairment to learning. Others are looking into children at risk, and exposure to age-inappropriate sexualization.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 14 Issue 3, Spring 1998, p9-17, il, por Periodical Website
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