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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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8 results for Child development
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Record #:
26059
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mel Levine is a professor of pediatrics and director of the Clinical Center for the Study of Development and Learning. Levine created observation tools to help teachers identify where a child is having difficulties and to measure mental processes. To Levine, the most important tactic is strengthening strengths, focusing on children’s passions.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 18 Issue 1, Fall 2001, p4-6, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26067
Author(s):
Abstract:
Psychologist J. Steven Reznick and his colleagues are trying to figure out when working memory develops, and whether it might be related to developmental disabilities. They measure a child’s development and cognitive abilities using a variety of technology and computer software tests.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 18 Issue 1, Fall 2001, p26-27, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26089
Author(s):
Abstract:
According to UNC researchers, the first emotional and physical bond between parent and child is important because it breaks in the physiological system that regulates attachment. Development can also be shaped by sounds heard before we are born.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 17 Issue 2, Winter 2001, p11-15, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26161
Abstract:
UNC researchers are trying to make children’s lives better. Child development researchers are studying the quality of day-care centers, and the impacts of visual impairment to learning. Others are looking into children at risk, and exposure to age-inappropriate sexualization.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 14 Issue 3, Spring 1998, p9-17, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26240
Author(s):
Abstract:
UNC researcher Diane Davis is studying behavioral development patterns in premature infants. She is trying to identify the premature infants who are at risk for developing long-term problems, so that better health interventions can be put into place.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Winter 1989, p3-5, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
26249
Author(s):
Abstract:
Child development researchers are studying different ways that public schools can help children who are having trouble learning. For one model they are exploring, a learning disability teacher co-teaches or provides assistance to the classroom teacher.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 6 Issue 4, Summer 1989, p10-11, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
29381
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina routinely collects information on maternal characteristics that are known risk factors for conditions associated with fetal, neonatal and post-neonatal deaths. This report presents a trend analysis of these characteristics over the past decade.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 21, Aug 1981, p1-7, bibl, f
Record #:
32169
Author(s):
Abstract:
Opossums are serving as powerful biomedical tools in studies being conducted by Dr. William Jurgelsky at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, near Raleigh. The newborn opossum is much like a two-month old human fetus in its ability to serve as a unique animal model for testing the effect of suspected toxins on infant development. This article discusses Jurgelsky’s experiments and discoveries in fetal development.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 3 Issue 7, July 1971, p20-21, il, por Periodical Website