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96 results for Brimleyana
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Record #:
19064
Abstract:
Sampling for larvae of six species of ocean-spawning, estuarine-dependent fishes was conducted inside Oregon Inlet and Ocracoke Inlet, two major entry points into the Pamlico Sound. The inlets difference in the abundance and size of species collected which was a function of water temperatures and water salinity.
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Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 25, July 1998, p144-155, map, bibl, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
19061
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Abstract:
The river frog occurs in aquatic and riparian habitats in the southeastern US, reaching the northern edge of its range in southeastern North Carolina. It is currently listed in the state as a species of concern being last documented in 1975, although current evidence suggests it may no longer exist in the state; reasons for its disappearance are unknown.
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Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 25, July 1998, p69-79, map, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
10002
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Brown discusses food habits of snakes from North and South Carolina, providing information on 690 food items from 479 snakes of 32 species.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 1, Mar 1979, p113-124, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
6572
Abstract:
Field observations of the American alligator were made incidental to a five-year study of the nursery use of Dutchman Creek estuary, near Southport, by estuarine dependent fishes and shell fishes. Alligators were most frequently seen between April and July and occurred over a wide range of salinities. Some individuals that inhabited the lower reaches of the estuary appeared to have shifted their distribution in response to a major alteration of this habitat.
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Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 6, Dec 1981, p111-117, il, map, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
6569
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H. H. and C. S. Brimley, immigrant English boys, came to Raleigh in 1880. Herbert became an outstanding taxidermist and worked for the Museum of Natural Science for sixty years, fifty-one as curator and director. Clement was an entomologist for the Agriculture Department and published the first catalog of insects in the South, The List of Insects of North Carolina. The Brimleys were the state's most influential naturalists, whose work left a lasting mark on the state
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 1, Mar 1979, p1-14, por, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
6571
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In recent years the groundhog, Marmota monax, has greatly increased its range in the Southeast and now is found in areas of the Piedmont Plateau and Coastal Plain where it did not occur in historical times. The change is distribution is believed to correlate with changing land use practices. Clearing of forests for agriculture purposes has increased the amount of habitat suitable for groundhogs in the Piedmont Plateau and Coastal Plain.
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Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 3, July 1980, p43-48, map, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
10004
Abstract:
Populations of the mole salamander (Ambystoma talpoideum) have been found in Union and Surry Counties. These are the state's first verified records of this salamander from east of the eastern Continental Divide. Three new locations for the four-toed salamander (Hemidactylium scutatum) have been found in the Coastal Plain.
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Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 1, Mar 1979, p135-139, map, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
10003
Abstract:
One terrestrial leech, Haemopis septagon, inhabits North Carolina in the swamps and moist floodplains of the eastern Piedmont and Coastal Plain. It was discovered in 1972 and is one of the newest additions to the state's known fauna. Large earthworms appear to be the primary food source.
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Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 1, Mar 1979, p129-134, il, map, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
10001
Abstract:
Tarplee reports on a study of fish populations located in two northeastern swamp streams, Duke and Hoggard Mill Creek, conducted from May to August 1972, to determine their composition and magnitude.
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Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 1, Mar 1979, p99-112, map, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
10000
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Abstract:
Many of the early voyagers and explorers, dating back to Thomas Hariot in 1588, reported sightings of parrots or parakeets in the Carolinas. McKinley discusses these early reports of the Carolina parakeet in North and South Carolina and what happened to it in later centuries.
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Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 1, Mar 1979, p81-98, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
10005
Abstract:
Findings of isolated and fragmentary bones in counties, including Sampson and Bladen, provide information on dinosaurs that once roamed what is now North Carolina.
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Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 2, Nov 1979, p1-28, il, map, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
6573
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A dichotomous key for identifying the tadpoles of North Carolina and a guide for their field identification with a hand lens are offered. Problems in identifying tadpoles are discussed.
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Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 6, Dec 1981, p119-127, il, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
1840
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Leatherback turtles have been sighted in the coastal waters off North Topsail Beach. The authors report their observations of leatherbacks regarding feeding behavior, fish associations, and the simultaneous occurrence of the turtles with jellyfish.
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Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 19, Dec 1993, p77-81, bibl, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
19
Abstract:
Smith provides black and white reproductions of John White's paintings representing the box turtle, diamond back terrapin, loggerhead turtle, West Indian iguana, and crocodile, as well as a brief account of White's role in the history of American exploration.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 16, July 1990, p119-131, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
1839
Abstract:
The first and only molluscan survey in the Neuse River basin was conducted in 1956. Since that time urbanization and industrialization have increased rapidly, potentially affecting molluscan population and distribution.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 19, Dec 1993, p61-64, bibl Periodical Website
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