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5 results for Leatherback turtle
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Record #:
4844
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Abstract:
The leatherback turtle is the largest sea turtle, measuring six feet long and weighing almost 1,400 pounds. In 2000, this endangered species laid four nests along the coast, one at Hatteras Village, two on Ocracoke, and one at Cape Lookout. Only the Hatteras nest produced hatchlings.
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Record #:
1840
Abstract:
Leatherback turtles have been sighted in the coastal waters off North Topsail Beach. The authors report their observations of leatherbacks regarding feeding behavior, fish associations, and the simultaneous occurrence of the turtles with jellyfish.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 19, Dec 1993, p77-81, bibl, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
14062
Author(s):
Abstract:
The leatherback sea turtle species is about one hundred million years old. It is also the world's largest turtle and can grow to a length of seven feet, with a flipper span of nine feet and a weight of over one thousand pounds. It can dive to a depth of over 3,900 feet.
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Record #:
30133
Abstract:
Information is presented on the occurrence of five species of marine turtles in North Carolina waters. The leatherback and loggerhead sea turtles, the two most commonly occurring species, are emphasized. Unpublished records indicate that the leatherback typically occurs in North Carolina throughout the warmer months in relatively shallow shelf waters, and may not be an open-ocean wanderer.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 5, July 1981, p96-105, il, map, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
34777
Abstract:
Typically, leatherback sea turtles nest on tropical beaches, but are now beginning to come further north and nest on the North Carolina shore. Fort Fisher State Recreation Area and Cape Lookout National Seashore have both been recently made home for a few nesting leatherback turtles. It is still rare to see, with a total of 39 confirmed nests since 1966.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 3, Summer 2018, p38-39, il Periodical Website
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