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20 results for Environmental education--Activity programs
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Record #:
10227
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Big Sweep in North Carolina is a volunteer effort started in 1987 to clean trash from beaches and waterways. The program is now in all 100 North Carolina counties. 18,000 volunteers retrieved over 720,000 pounds of trash in 2007. Now Big Sweep has produced a book to make middle school students aware of the need for a clean environment. The publication included eleven litter awareness lessons and was written by two North Carolina teachers.
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Record #:
25246
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The Student Outreach Series has educated 2nd, 5th, 8th, and 12th graders on environmental issues in a way they can understand and one that will, hopefully, get them more involved in protecting the environment.
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Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 20 Issue 3, Summer 2001, p5, por
Record #:
26513
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Environmental, community, and church groups in North Carolina are springing into action for Earth Day on April 22. The N.C. Wildlife Federation is emphasizing long-term behavioral changes to lessen our impact on the environment. They will promote environmental education in schools and work with educators to develop teaching materials.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 37 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1990, p6-8, il
Record #:
26554
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Pete Bromley is the new wildlife extension specialist at the N.C. Agricultural Extension Service, a public outreach program of land grant universities. He is in charge of activities in wildlife, inland fisheries, and aquaculture, and is developing programs in wetland and waterfowl management.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 37 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1990, p8-9, il
Record #:
26677
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The Annual Spring Conservation Retreat, co-sponsored by the N.C. Wildlife Federation and the N.C. Agricultural Extension Service, was held on May 2-5 near Cashiers, North Carolina. The retreat is an educational opportunity oriented toward families, featuring classes ranging from basket weaving to fly-fishing.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 32 Issue 3/4, May/Aug 1985, p3, por
Record #:
26703
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Emphasis on educating our youth is important in shaping attitudes towards wildlife resources and wise use of those resources. Two notable education programs in North Carolina are the 4-H wildlife projects and the Fur, Fish and Game Rendezvous.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 31 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1984, p3
Record #:
26885
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The Environmental Education Service is now offering programs on numerous environmental topics to day care centers, public and private elementary schools, and other civic groups throughout the Triangle and surrounding North Carolina communities. Developed by Steven and Beth Law, their programs use multimedia to teach school children about various nature topics.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 2, Feb 1982, p12-13, por
Record #:
3095
Abstract:
Using the state's natural areas, the North Carolina Wildlife Resource Commission's N.C. WILD program has developed educational sites that provide students with hands-on experiences of the environment.
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Record #:
3442
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The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission's N.C. Wild program not only teaches about ecology and natural habitats, but also utilizes skills from art, biology, geography, and language arts areas.
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Record #:
26742
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The youth participated in the second Fur, Fish and Game Rendezvous held at Camp Millstone near Ellerbe, North Carolina. The camp focuses on environmental education, outdoor recreation, and ethics. The campers spent five days participating in fourteen different classes and demonstrations presented by the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 31 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1984, p4, il, por
Record #:
27378
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Governor Jim Martin and the state of North Carolina are struggling to find a home for their hazardous waste. A planned incinerator has been rejected in 15 counties due to citizen opposition and concern for public health. One solution is the forthcoming bill named the Toxic Use Reduction Act which proposes a shift toward toxic waste reduction and commitment to clean manufacturing rather than hazardous waste disposal. Businesses, politicians, and environmentalists believe a solution can be met if all sides are willing to compromise.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 9 Issue 8, Feb. 20-26 1991, p8-9 Periodical Website
Record #:
29856
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Abstract:
Go Yarok!, an initiative of the Asheville Jewish Community Center (JCC), seeks to connect people of all ages and backgrounds to permaculture, Jewish traditions and spirituality. The program offers adults the chance to take part in educational activities, contribute to the JCC garden, visit local farms and volunteer for environmental service projects in the community.
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Record #:
31715
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The third annual Earth Walk was held by seventh grade students of the Charles W. Stanford Junior High School in Orange County. Personnel from several state and federal environmental agencies provided on-site activities teaching the students about the earth’s natural processes, plants, wildlife, and the availability of natural resources.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 5 Issue 12, Dec 1973, p20-21, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
34559
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The Junior Curator position at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences helps students between grades 7 and 12 to learn about what it takes to work with live animals at the museum. This article focuses on high school senior Elizabeth Jones, who started as a seventh grader in the program. The Junior Curator position allows students to interact with animals, lead education and outreach programs, and hone their skills to become a leader in the curator circuit.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 9 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 2001, p9-11, il, por
Record #:
34570
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The North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences serves a vast array of citizens in their outreach and education programs. Senior centers, Scout organizations, and school groups are among the groups that benefit from these programs. The museum has also become fluid in adjusting the programs to help incorporate better teaching styles for deaf, blind, bilingual, and distance learning patrons.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Fall/Win 2001, p16-19, il, por