NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


9 results for Gospel Music
Currently viewing results 1 - 9
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
5399
Author(s):
Abstract:
Shirley Caesar is the first lady of gospel music, having won 11 Grammy, 19 Dove, and 13 Stellar Awards, as well as being inducted into the Gospel Music Hall of Fame 20 years ago. A former Durham city councilwoman, Cesar is minister of a Raleigh Pentecostal Church and also finds time to perform two or three concerts around the country 45 weekends out of the year. At age 63 she shows no sign of slowing down.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 70 Issue 2, July 2002, p102-103, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
5470
Author(s):
Abstract:
Gospel music - Southern, black, contemporary, and inspirational - is very popular across the state. However, at the moment, there is no place to document this gospel heritage. Enter Dennis Sparks, Eddie Albert, and Claude Hopper of Rockingham County. The three purchased the closed 500,000-square-foot Mayodan Cotton Mill and plan to turn it into the North Carolina Gospel Music Hall of Fame.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
5569
Author(s):
Abstract:
Connie, Cleonia, and Celester Badgett learned to harmonize under their father's direction. They sing in the jubilee style, a form popular in the 1930s and 1940s. They received a 1990 N.C. Folk Heritage Award for continuing the gospel tradition.
Record #:
27878
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina residents gather at the weekly Picking & Grinning at Schley Grange Hall outside Hillsborough. The two-hour gathering has been going on for ten years and brings residents together to hear, sing, and play gospel and country music. The gatherings sometimes have as many as two hundred attend and all are invited to participate. The sessions are important to members of the community, especially older individuals and celebrate their musical heritage.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 10, March 2010, p22-23 Periodical Website
Record #:
31511
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Caldwell Schuyler family of Surry County’s Lowgap community has been performing Southern gospel music at various churches, revivals and day-long singings for years. These forays and the lifestyle of this old-fashioned, church-going American family are chronicled in a new television film documentary entitled, “Give the World a Smile.” The show takes viewers inside the Schuyler home and profiles their lives, beliefs, and music.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 13 Issue 9, Sept 1981, p10, por
Record #:
36502
Author(s):
Abstract:
JC Kemp represents the large scale musical transformation that took place during the 1950s in the central Appalachians. He combined old time fiddle music and gospel singing, contributing to the bluegrass sound.
Record #:
36845
Abstract:
The Cockman family performed gospel hymns for nearly 25 years; the traveled from Florida to New York performing for churches, festivals, weddings, funerals, and more. The family group also teaches others to play music and sing and have recorded their own albums.
Record #:
35882
Author(s):
Abstract:
The relationship between blues and gospel can be seen as two sides of the same coin; both blues are for despair, and gospel is for hope, relating to the same subject. The blues-gospel rap is a map for the psychologically unified view of the world. Using this dichotomy of hope-despair, the positions are either the blues are the illegitimate child of the spiritual, or that spiritual understanding is a marriage of hope and despair.
Record #:
36331
Author(s):
Abstract:
Continuing tradition from West African roots, prayer meeting life experiences come through songs and testimonies. The church goers praise the Lord through chanting, body expressions, and shouting. Stories are told of everyday experiences but told through the power of God.