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21 results for Film-making--North Carolina
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Record #:
17789
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Central Piedmont Community College may not be the most likely place, but the school has built a program around film-making that is launching some impressive careers in advertising and movies.
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Record #:
18610
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Conceived and produced as an education movie to be shown throughout North Carolina's public schools, the 1921 silent film \"The Lost Colony Film\" was created by a group of Outer Banks residents led by educator Mabel Evans. The film depicts the violent interactions between the early English colonists and natives, as well as the mysterious loss of the colony.
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Record #:
18611
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The 1921 silent film, \"The Lost Colony Film\" has at times been as difficult to locate as the colony it depicts. Since the film was released in 1921 there have been periods of time, spanning several years, where the film was not locatable by anyone. Tom Whiteside had spent considerable time and energy locating and preserving the film for future generations.
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Record #:
18631
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Elisabeth Benfey's Duke University film class had the unique opportunity to adapt into film, stories written by local North Carolina authors and was able to consult those authors during the process. Randall Kenan's short story, The Foundations of the Earth, was the selected story for a group of students and discussed in detail.
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Record #:
18633
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Books are a common source of stories utilized in the filmmaking process. Author George Hovis examines the rich literary history of North Carolina and selects 10 stories or books that he believes would make good feature films.
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Record #:
23562
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Boudin examines how Charlotte's film industry has taken off over the years and provides explanations for why it is not more successful.
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Record #:
24989
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A new concept for a film festival, contestants in the 100 Words Film Festival will have only 100 words that can be used during the course of the short film. The idea was coined after Scott Galloway, founder of Susie Films, watched his kids watching YouTube.
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Record #:
25596
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North Carolina is the fastest growing film industry in the nation. This can be attributed to the state’s low level of unionization, low costs of filming, aggressive efforts of the state government, long shooting seasons, and varied landscapes.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 2 Issue 18, Sept 28-Oct 11 1984, p3, 5, por Periodical Website
Record #:
27590
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The forthcoming film Joe, directed by David Gordon Green, has deep roots in North Carolina. North Carolina native and Duke professor Gary Hawkins adapted the screen play for the film and was the teacher of Green at the North Carolina School of the Arts. Hawkins discusses the process of adapting Larry Brown’s novel, working on the film, and working with Green.
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Record #:
27827
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The state of film production in North Carolina is getting better. Direct spending on film in the state is expected to be almost six times what it was in 2010 (75 million to 450 million). Major films like The Hunger Games, Iron Man 3 and TV shows Homeland, Revenge, and Hart of Dixie are currently filming in North Carolina or plan to film in North Carolina in the next year. Wilmington and Charlotte are major film production areas. The success of the industry is credited to Governor Perdue and the legislature for offering new film incentives in 2011 which have attracted new films.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 52, December 2011, p21-22 Periodical Website
Record #:
28086
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North Carolina Film Office Director Aaron Syrett discusses challenges facing the regional film industry. The state legislature has approved an incentives package to help revitalize the state’s film industry, but film industry strikes are slowing production. Reality television shows have forced television movies off of the air and many of those movies were made in Wilmington, NC. Additionally, fewer television shows are being filmed in the state. Syrett does believe that NC has the potential to become a major hub for independent film making.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 1, January 2008, p18 Periodical Website
Record #:
28131
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The history of how the Triangle area became open to art films over the last 25 years is detailed by local critic Godfrey Cheshire. Part of what helped the film scene thrive was writing about the films and the inclusion of local film festivals. The area will likely not become a popular place for filmmaking and the scene is changing with the internet and an aging movie-going population.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 15, April 2008, p51 Periodical Website
Record #:
28140
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Locals from Durham remember the filming of Bull Durham. Local residents who served as extras, an audio assistant, and a local bar owner whose bar was in the film remember the filming of the movie. The weather, a day with actor Tim Robbins, stolen memorabilia, long filming days, and parking issues are all shared in stories about the filming of the movie.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 27, July 2008, p17 Periodical Website
Record #:
28141
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With the twentieth anniversary of the film Bull Durham arriving, the author can’t understand why Durham, its residents, and baseball fans love the film. The author describes why the film inaccurately portrays minor league baseball, why it is an unoriginal, poorly cast, and poorly written movie, and how the film did not represent life in Durham.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 27, July 2008, p18 Periodical Website
Record #:
28472
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Film industry spending in North Carolina has declined significantly over the last five years. The industry has suffered after the General Assembly gutted a more generous incentive program three years ago. While North Carolina’s film infrastructure is one of the best outside of California, film production companies are lured elsewhere because of better incentives. Unclear is how the 2016 House Bill 2 or “bathroom bill” has affected the state’s ability to attract films.