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9 results for Employees--Training of
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Record #:
4369
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the past decade the Hispanic population increased 128 percent and the Asian 83 percent in Alexander, Burke, Caldwell, and Catawba Counties. Hispanic and Asians are drawn by a large demand for manufacturing, service, and construction jobs. Employers help these workers adjust to new surroundings by hiring bilingual individuals to work with them, providing work-site classes in the English language, and having company supervisors learn the foreign language of the workers.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 57 Issue 11, Nov 1999, p10, il, f
Record #:
17594
Author(s):
Abstract:
The city of Durham has gotten busy training its employees, with divisions for firemen and police officers, including newly hired police women.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 18 Issue 10, June 1952, p4-5, 16-17
Record #:
36244
Author(s):
Abstract:
Reducing recidivism for ex-offenders were programs such as the NC State Industry Expansion Solutions (IES). Through this program, they earn a Lean Manufacturing Certificate. Attesting to the success of this program were statistics related to job growth and economic impact. Asserting its necessity were statistics related to the likelihood of recidivism in the absence of employment.
Record #:
36261
Author(s):
Abstract:
East Carolina University’s Pharmaceutical Service Center, also called PSC@ECU, promised a positive economic and occupational impact on the local community and state. Among the project’s goals to ensure this positive impact: educating students and workers for the highly regulated pharmaceutical development and manufacturing environments; enabling workers to be immediately productive in complex jobs requiring multi-disciplinary skills.
Record #:
36284
Author(s):
Abstract:
Community colleges, traditionally considered a second rate form of higher education, is increasingly making a first grade contribution to the state’s economy and work force. North Carolina’s fifty-eight community colleges are proving themselves an asset for fields such as biotechnology, welding, law enforcement, aviation, and manufacturing.
Record #:
38215
Author(s):
Abstract:
Despite not making the final bid as site for Amazon’s second US headquarters, the city of Hickory can claim fulfillment of its economic promise. Fulfillment of its promise is in industries such as furniture, which can measure success in 60% of furniture sold in the United States connected to the area. Success on a global scale can be measured in Hickory Furniture Mart’s attracting visitors from Asia, the Middle East, and Europe and drawing 500,000 visits annually.
Source:
Record #:
38231
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many small towns in North Carolina are experiencing a crisis towns and cities are invulnerable to. Younger generations are moving out in search of better jobs; companies once occupational mainstays are closing; opportunities for infrastructure improvement and economic recovery are lost. For their citizens, the toll can be seen in skyrocketing rates of poverty, disability, overdose, and addiction. Efforts to combat this crisis include Governor Roy Cooper’s Hometown Strong. This program is designed to rejuvenate downtowns, upskill workers, provide small business loans, and enhance high speed Internet connections.
Record #:
38240
Author(s):
Abstract:
On the state’s political and economic backburner for many decades was small towns. In response to the ensued crisis was Governor Cooper’s initiative, Hometown Strong. This program, facilitating cooperation between state agencies and local leaders, identifies and implements plans that may address issues such as job skills training, internet access, small business startup, infrastructure, and representation in state government.