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4 results for Guilford Technical Community College
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Record #:
6953
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dr. Don Cameron is president of Guilford Technical Community College. When he arrived at the college in 1981 as executive vice-president, there were 8,000 students enrolled. Funds to award scholarships totaled $600,000. In 2004, the school has an enrollment of 30,000 and a scholarship fund of $4.3 million. Cameron is a big promoter of workforce preparedness and was credited in a 1996 Wall Street Journal article with developing a model program for workforce preparedness. He is featured in NORTH CAROLINA magazine's “executive profile.”
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 62 Issue 12, Dec 2004, p16-19, por
Record #:
36243
Author(s):
Abstract:
Proving the persistent presence of the manufacturing industry in the state’s economic development are eight experts. Questions related to manufacturing covered these topics: its current state, how it has changed, how it recruits and develops workers, what can help sustain it, how can federal initiatives help it, and how it will change over the next two decades. Their responses collectively indicate the important role community colleges play in its development, changes in business ethics, and need for ongoing technological advancements.
Source:
Record #:
36247
Author(s):
Abstract:
Attesting to the potential and positive impact of North Carolina’s 58 community colleges were profiles of Asheville-Buncombe, Edgecombe, Fayetteville Technical, Guilford Technical, Lenoir, Pitt Community, and Vance-Granville. Asserting to their potential and positive impact in North Carolina were statistics for: average median wage, number of companies receiving customized job training, and numbers of military members who will advance their education, post service.
Record #:
36284
Author(s):
Abstract:
Community colleges, traditionally considered a second rate form of higher education, is increasingly making a first grade contribution to the state’s economy and work force. North Carolina’s fifty-eight community colleges are proving themselves an asset for fields such as biotechnology, welding, law enforcement, aviation, and manufacturing.