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7 results for Recessions
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Record #:
1828
Abstract:
North Carolina cities and towns employed diverse strategies in dealing with the effects of the recent recession.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 44 Issue 8, Aug 1994, p1,8-9, il
Record #:
27370
Author(s):
Abstract:
Against conventional wisdom, the Triangle area is not “recession proof” and is feeling the effects of the national recession. Local merchants, economists, and real-estate experts have shared some of the most concerning problems facing the area. The job picture for 1991 is predicted to be flat at best, the real-estate market is suffering and will struggle to rebound to former highs, and this recession could be worse than the 1982 recession.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 9 Issue 3, Jan. 16-22 1991, p10-11 Periodical Website
Record #:
23353
Author(s):
Abstract:
With the occurrence of the current economic downturn, past financial crisis should be remembered. The Panic’s of 1819, 1837, 1873, 1893, and 1907 were all caused by various changes in banking, railroads, currency and the like. The post-World War I recession hit Pitt County farmers hard, as did the Great Depression which brought a low point in Pitt County in 1931. Tobacco prices plummeted, until Dr. J.Y. Joyner intervened, poor families were fed at the Court House, and the East Carolina Teachers College raised vegetables and hogs to provide food for students, staff, and faculty. Many enterprises sprung up during these desperate times, including the use of the “Hoover Cart.”
Record #:
34502
Author(s):
Abstract:
Recently, the United States was hit by one of the worst recessions since the Great Depression. While the state of North Carolina historically has fared better than other states during recessions, this recession hit much harder, showing larger than average unemployment rates for the state. While recovery is taking a while, the United States and North Carolina are both seeing slow, upward growth in the economy.
Source:
Economics Bulletin (NoCar HC 107 N8 E36), Vol. 4 Issue , March 2011, p1-19, il, f
Record #:
36243
Author(s):
Abstract:
Proving the persistent presence of the manufacturing industry in the state’s economic development are eight experts. Questions related to manufacturing covered these topics: its current state, how it has changed, how it recruits and develops workers, what can help sustain it, how can federal initiatives help it, and how it will change over the next two decades. Their responses collectively indicate the important role community colleges play in its development, changes in business ethics, and need for ongoing technological advancements.
Source:
Record #:
36249
Author(s):
Abstract:
Redefining the meaning and location of workplace were employees called super-commuters or road warriors by the author. Included in his discussion of this occupational trend: the Great Recession surge; super-commuter characteristics; cultural changes yielding the acceptance of super-commuting; and profilers of three commuters. 12-14
Record #:
36309
Author(s):
Abstract:
Giving a considerable kick-start to America’s economy and job development is small businesses. Experts are hopeful the recent uptick in entrepreneurial ventures will bring the needed economic and occupational boost. The author believes this trend’s continuation includes making establishment of innovative and disruptive businesses possible for the next generation. Hood believed this was possible through activities such as entrepreneurship education programs through 4-H clubs and the Raleigh Children’s Business Fair.