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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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17 results for Employment
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Record #:
5905
Abstract:
McCloskey examines legal cases in North Carolina \"involving employment policy manuals, and the failure of the courts to apply well-established principles of contract law in further analyses of these cases.\"
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North Carolina Central Law Journal (NoCar KF 292 N64 A7x), Vol. 25 Issue 2, 2003, p163-181, f
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Record #:
15481
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Abstract:
The Works Progress Administration provided full-time jobs 20 days a month and seven hours a day with a subsistence wage for every employable household head in American who could not find employment in private industry. The goal: 3,500,000 employable men to be engaged in useful and permanent public works by November 1, 1935.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 31, Dec 1935, p1-2, 22, f
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Record #:
16739
Abstract:
The issue of job layoffs in North Carolina is a hot topic. And the state's community colleges are at the forefront in the effort to help those workers who have lost their jobs.
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Record #:
18209
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Abstract:
In the mid-1950s, North Carolinians faced several problems revolving around changing industrial trends and providing young citizens with employment opportunities within the state. During the following decades, emphasis shifted to the research triangle and specifically the universities (Duke, North Carolina State, and UNC Chapel Hill) and the development of research and professional development. The author reviews the significance of the research triangle for the region and the state in supplying training and employment to young state residents.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 35 Issue 7, Apr 1969, p17-19
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Record #:
20060
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Abstract:
North Carolina's economy has been deeply impacted by a worldwide recession that resulted from the largest financial crisis since the Great Depression. There is evidence that the financial sector is healing and that the job market in North Carolina is nearing a recovery. This bulletin will examine the outlook for the job market in North Carolina, as well as, the larger economic factors affecting growth in North Carolina.
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Economics Bulletin (NoCar HC 107 N8 E36), Vol. Issue 2, Jul 2009, p1-9, il
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Record #:
23897
Abstract:
In the Western North Carolina Round Table, leaders from the region discuss western North Carolina's culture, progress, and potential for moving forward.
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Record #:
30157
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Abstract:
Non-agricultural employment experienced a small lag from May to March. However, in areas such as defense and textiles, cities like Asheville, Greensboro, and Raleigh are expecting a need for employees by September. Industries are then anticipating the employment rate to reach a point above the lag in spring.
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Record #:
30450
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The falling labor participation rate in North Carolina is making it harder for the economy to experience strong economic growth. Further, the number of banks continues to drop, and merger activity is expected to increase over the next couple years in the state. This article discusses employment and economic trends, and new regulations for financial institutions.
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Carolina Banker (HG 2153 N8 C66), Vol. 93 Issue 1, Spring 2014, p19-20, por
Record #:
30602
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Abstract:
This article reviews the history of the employment-at-will doctrine, with special attention on its use in North Carolina. Also discussed is the 1989 North Carolina Supreme Court decision in the Coman v. Thomas Manufacturing Company, Inc. case, in which the employment-at-will doctrine was modified.
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Carolina Coast Business Review (NoCar HF 5001 C38x), Vol. 8 Issue 1, Jan 1990, p9-10, bibl, f
Record #:
31280
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Abstract:
Due to expansion of industry and business, North Carolina is one of the fastest growing states in the country. African Americans represent about 25% of North Carolina's population, and 21% of the labor force. At the time, African American unemployment rates are higher given the limits of certain educational and cultural opportunities in the past. However, African Americans are moving beyond the constraints of certain job categories.
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Record #:
31371
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Abstract:
Within the next few years, as the result of the adoption of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, is is expected that there will be changes to the patterns of employment and personal income by race and sex in North Carolina. Occupational qualifications will open up to a broader range of the population based on availability, acceptability, and adaptability.
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Record #:
36250
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Abstract:
Winston-Salem based Hanesbrand takes its work overseas. By selling products destined for landfills to recyclers, its helps to provide a new lease on life for items later used by medical teams offering free medical care in the Caribbean and Central America. Courtesy of teaming up with Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, patients from places such as the Dominican Republic receive a new lease on life through medical treatments and procedures.
Record #:
36244
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Abstract:
Reducing recidivism for ex-offenders were programs such as the NC State Industry Expansion Solutions (IES). Through this program, they earn a Lean Manufacturing Certificate. Attesting to the success of this program were statistics related to job growth and economic impact. Asserting its necessity were statistics related to the likelihood of recidivism in the absence of employment.
Record #:
36249
Author(s):
Abstract:
Redefining the meaning and location of workplace were employees called super-commuters or road warriors by the author. Included in his discussion of this occupational trend: the Great Recession surge; super-commuter characteristics; cultural changes yielding the acceptance of super-commuting; and profilers of three commuters. 12-14
Record #:
36242
Author(s):
Abstract:
How successful the United States is at fulfilling immigrants’ employment opportunities is illustrated by factors such as average hourly wage, types of employment, and North Carolina counties with the highest and lowest employment rates.