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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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9 results for African Americans
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Record #:
4625
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A joint activity of the North Carolina Division of Tourism, Film and Sports Development, and the Department of Cultural Resources, The Rich Heritage of African-Americans in North Carolina, highlights statewide historic sites and cultural events of interest to African-Americans.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 58 Issue 5, May 2000, p6, il
Record #:
7440
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Many individuals in North Carolina participate in recreating the Civil War period with historical accuracy in dress and battles. Members of Battery B are typical reenactors, but in one way are very different. The Wilmington-based unit's full name is Battery B, 2nd Regiment, United States Colored Troops (USCT). The crew is the only African-American artillery reenactment unit on the East Coast. Battery B attends over a dozen events a year, from parades to battles like Averaboro and Bentonville. The participants are drawn to reenacting through a love of history, camaraderie, family participation, and the spiritual aspect of being where family members fought or died.
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Record #:
25868
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Tim McMillan is an adjunct assistant professor of African and African American Studies. His upcoming book covers UNC’s relationship with slavery, and features Wilson Caldwell who served the university both as slave and paid employee.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 23 Issue 2, Winter 2007, p34-35, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26092
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Nutrition researchers started PRAISE, a nutrition intervention program aimed at minorities. African Americans suffer certain cancers and diet-related diseases at higher rates than the general population. Churches in eight North Carolina counties participate in PRAISE, emphasizing healthy eating habits and recipes.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 17 Issue 2, Winter 2001, p24-27, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26087
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Michael Harris, assistant professor of African and African American art, pursues both scholarship and art. He explores connections between African American religions and Cuban and Brazilian religions such as Santeria and Candomble.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 17 Issue 2, Winter 2001, p6-8, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
28933
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The St. Joseph’s Historic Foundation, Inc. has launched the African American Cultural Tourism Website. A project funded by the North Carolina Arts Council, the site offers visitors information about fourteen of the state’s most prominent African American cultural organizations.
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NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 15 Issue 2, Winter 2001, p10
Record #:
31280
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Due to expansion of industry and business, North Carolina is one of the fastest growing states in the country. African Americans represent about 25% of North Carolina's population, and 21% of the labor force. At the time, African American unemployment rates are higher given the limits of certain educational and cultural opportunities in the past. However, African Americans are moving beyond the constraints of certain job categories.
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Record #:
34441
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Biddleville Cemetery is a 145-year-old burial plot in Charlotte where black veterans of both world wars and the Spanish-American War rest. Until recently, the cemetery had not been listed as an official cemetery or tied to any one specific church. Local resident Nolie Steele helped to recognize and protect Biddleville Cemetery as an official historic Mecklenburg County landmark, and continues to research the veterans who are buried there so that their graves can be marked.
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Record #:
38191
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The hole in the bucket analogy alludes to the dearth of black male public school teachers and negative impact this has on black male students. Helping to attract more black males to teaching and giving them the ability to be positive role models is Profound Gentlemen, founded in 2014 by Jason Terrell and Mario Shaw. This nonprofit helps current and would-be teachers to have the resources, training, and support network needed to enter and stay in the profession.