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19 results for Mecklenburg County--History
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Record #:
12787
Abstract:
Settled around 1750, the residents of Mecklenburg County have enjoyed a lucrative and varied history. Sustained through a variety of agricultural and eventually, commercial ventures, residents of Mecklenburg initially relied heavily upon cotton. Joining in the American dream of finding gold, Mecklenburgers first discovered the rare mineral in 1799. Dubbed by Cornwallis as the \"hornet's nest of stubborn revolutionaries,\" Mecklenburgers experienced the War of Sugar Creek, instigated a military campaign against a group of South Carolinian Tories, known as Scoffelites, and wrote their own Declaration of Independence. Mecklenburgers additionally participated in the Civil War, furnishing some 2,700 men to the cause, or one sixth of the county population.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 30 Issue 23, Apr 1963, p12-13, 31-37, il, por
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Record #:
12833
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One of Mecklenburg's family historians, Amanda Rose Coffey, has been collecting and cataloging information regarding two of the county's most famous families, the Coffeys and the Alexanders. Coffey has filed dozens of letters, diaries, ledgers, and relics in a series of boxes, some of which date to pre-revolutionary times.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 28 Issue 16, Jan 1961, p13, por
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Record #:
18372
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Continuing his travels around the state, Goerch describes the things of interest he found in Mecklenburg County. Charlotte, the state's largest city, is located there. Goerch writes that \"the county has one of the most interesting histories of any county in the state.\" President James K. Polk and Stonewall Jackson's daughter, Julia, were both born there. Davidson College was founded in the county in 1837.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 22, Nov 1941, p1-4, 24-24-27, il, por
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Record #:
19410
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Charlotte has a long history dating back before the American Revolution. One event that spurred its growth was the discovery of gold that occurred before the California gold strike of 1849. Young examines the city's history and the agricultural and industrial growth over the last century.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 40, Mar 1944, p18-26, il, por
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Record #:
21151
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This social history uses an analysis of social structures, social groupings, social interactions, and power configurations to examine the exercise of power in the antebellum South. Focusing on the attributes of power-holders and their importance in shaping any society via the role of the planter/slaveholder, the author uses Mecklenburg County as a case study because of its representative antebellum attributes and the postwar changes that occurred there.
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Record #:
21527
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This article examines North Carolina's experience with the Rosenwald Schools, using Mecklenburg County as the case study. Rosenwald Schools were an educational system for Southern black children who were excluded from white schools. Founded in the 1910s by Booker T. Washington and philanthropist Julius Rosenwald, the schools were a limited success. Over 5,300 schools were constructed throughout the South and Mecklenburg County had 26. By the 1930s though, the Rosenwald Foundation admitted that the schools were not accomplishing the desired effect of educating blacks to live in a white-dominated society. The foundation then stopped funding the schools in order to promote black and white cooperation through other methods.
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North Carolina Historical Review (NoCar F251 .N892), Vol. 65 Issue 4, Oct 1988, p387-444 , il, por, map, f Periodical Website
Record #:
21884
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This article examines the chair-making tradition of Mecklenburg County through the analysis of four chairs from the late 18th century. By analyzing the chairs, the tradition can be traced back to prior forms before the artisans migrated to North Carolina, which affected the style and technology of construction.
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Record #:
24124
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Charlotte's Hebrew Cemetery is a Jewish burial ground that is not only a place to revere the dead, but also provides insight into Jewish culture and Charlotte's history. Mayors, politicians, Confederate soldiers, and other important Charlotte residents are buried here.
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Record #:
24582
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In Davidson, North Carolina there is an old Wayside Inn that was erected by the Dinkins family to serve as a stopping place for travelers. This article discusses the history and uses of the Wayside Inn.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 39 Issue 12, November 1971, p8-10, il, por
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Record #:
24626
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This article presents the history of Mecklenburg County, from the early days of its settlement to the origination of the county’s name.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 30 Issue 24, April 1963, p12-13, 31, il, por
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Record #:
24898
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An examination of the life of an average citizen living in Charlotte in 1968 provides a view of the history of race relations, from the desegregation lunch counters to the still-present dangers for African Americans today.
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Record #:
24929
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The east Charlotte neighborhood, Oakhurst, was established in 1915. Now over 100 years old, the neighborhood continues to grow and maintain its sense of history.
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Record #:
21991
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An essay on events in colonial and revolutionary North Carolina with a particular focus on Mecklenburg County and recurring religious and political themes.
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Record #:
22256
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This article discusses the Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence, which is commonly believed to be the first public declaration of independence from the Crown, in the colonies. It includes a reprinting of the original declaration as well as correspondence between several colonial leaders regarding the declaration and the political climate in North Carolina.
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Record #:
22468
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The Spratt burying-ground in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina is one of the oldest burying places in the state. Many of the inscriptions on tombstones found in the graveyard pre-date the American Revolution.
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