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5 results for Rural-urban migration
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Record #:
2351
Abstract:
From 1980 to 1990 about 400,000 people moved to the state. New jobs and industries in the three largest metropolitan areas attracted Blacks to return, as well as large numbers of Asians and Hispanics. In-state residents moved to urban from rural areas.
Source:
Record #:
2345
Abstract:
Whites left the state in the 19th Century because of farm problems and poor state government, while lack of opportunities and a repressive environment caused Blacks to leave. As conditions improved for both, the need to leave lessened.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 34 Issue 2, Spring 1995, p27-32, il, por
Record #:
31710
Abstract:
Many communities in North Carolina are experiencing rapid change as the population and urban development grows. John Shore, director of the North Carolina Land Use Congress, discusses land use base studies, the role of local government, taxation, public investment, and land use regulations.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 5 Issue 10, Oct 1973, p11
Record #:
32226
Author(s):
Abstract:
Thomas W. Willis, director of East Carolina University Regional Development Institute, discusses how rural North Carolina communities can stop rural decline. The rural farm population is decreasing and undergoing drastic changes, as more people migrate to urban area. Rural and smaller communities should form an alliance in the pursuit of economic development and better opportunities of growth.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 1 Issue 3, Oct 1969, p6-7, por
Record #:
39589
Author(s):
Abstract:
The closing of Eden’s MillerCoors negatively impacted the town’s other large business, Morehead Memorial Hospital. Its closing served as a reminder of factors that leave towns like Eden and its rural Rockingham County economically vulnerable, such as brain drain and the rural-urban divide. Believed reasons why it closed included Anheuser-Busch In-Bev’s purchased SAB-Miller not having competition. Believed reasons why it remains closed includes the Economic Development Partnership of North Carolina favoring cities.