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5 results for Rose, Paul Howard, 1881-1955
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Record #:
10166
Abstract:
P. H. Rose created a family business that grew into a retail giant. He started in 1915, in Henderson, opening stores that would eventually bear the name Rose's. During the chain's heyday in the 1960s and 1970s sales grew from $54 million to over $500 million.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 76 Issue 2, July 2008, p36-38, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
11462
Abstract:
After seeing an early business venture fail, P. H. Rose met success with his store in Henderson, which opened in 1915. From there it grew into a chain of stores, called Rose's, now numbering 68 in North and South Carolina, Virginia, and Tennessee.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 1 Issue 30, Dec 1933, p13, por
Full Text:
Record #:
14732
Abstract:
P. H. Rose started out with nothing. Today, he and his associates control a chain of stores that are located in several states and are doing a tremendous business.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 22, Oct 1944, p10-11, 19, 23, f
Full Text:
Record #:
36311
Author(s):
Abstract:
Roses, opened in 1915, experienced an economic wilting by the early nineties, which necessitated its bankruptcy filing. In 1995, the Variety Wholesalers-owned chain blossomed anew with a narrowed marketing approach. This approach bore fruit in the opening of stores in Indiana, Ohio, and Pennsylvania, and the prospect of opening 30-40 new stores annually.
Record #:
36308
Author(s):
Abstract:
For Henderson, the word roses can remind natives of a common surname in town. Two native sons most associated with the name: Charlie Rose, longtime host of the TV program “CBS This Morning”; Paul Rose, founder of the department store that opened in 1915. The word can also prompt reminders of Henderson’s blossoming economic development, in establishment of businesses like Iams Pet Foods and a Durham semiconductor firm, Semprius.