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62 results for Textile industry
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Record #:
29
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N.S. Jagannathan is an accountant for Tolaram Fibers whose actions led to a $36 million profit for the company.
Record #:
197
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Daniel A. Tompkins is the South's pioneer machinery agent based in Charlotte, North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 9, Feb 1992, p14-15, il, por
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Record #:
588
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Abstract:
Julian examines the importance of textiles to North Carolina as the nation celebrates the 200th anniversary of the industry.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 48 Issue 11, Nov 1990, p18-19, 21-22, 24, il
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Record #:
816
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Henry C. Humphreys, Jr., president of National Spinning Co. in Washington, NC, is the new leader of the NC Textile Manufacturers Association.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 50 Issue 10, Oct 1992, p8-11, por
Record #:
1256
Author(s):
Abstract:
Faced with European Community protectionism, Chairman Allen Mebane of Unifi Inc., a polyester-yarn finishing company based in Greensboro, decided the way to beat the Europeans was to join them. He established a plant in Ireland and has plans for more.
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Record #:
1412
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Chuck Hayes, CEO of textile manufacturer Guilford Mills, strongly supports passage of the North American Free Trade Agreement. Oliver focuses on the potential impact of the agreement on jobs.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 51 Issue 12, Dec 1993, p30, il
Record #:
1811
Author(s):
Abstract:
N.C. State University's College of Textiles, the Textile Clothing Technology Corp. in Cary, and Cotton Inc. in Raleigh are contributing to major research efforts designed to strengthen the textile industry's long-term competitive position.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 52 Issue 8, Aug 1994, p44-51, il
Record #:
2152
Author(s):
Abstract:
Textile revenues have fluctuated for state mills as consumers put their money into durable goods in 1994 and costs for raw materials increased. However, the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) is seen as a boost to revenues from increased trade.
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Record #:
3062
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Fieldcrest Cannon, Inc., headquartered in Kannapolis, lost over $20 million in 1995, through low retail sales and rising cotton prices. The company looks to restructuring, operating cost cuts, and factory upgrades to remedy this.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 16 Issue 8, Aug 1996, p30-31,33-34,36-38, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3940
Author(s):
Abstract:
Introduction of computers and automation into the textile industry has allowed it not only to survive but also thrive at home and in the international marketplace.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 56 Issue 11, Nov 1998, p48,50,52-57, il
Record #:
4418
Author(s):
Abstract:
At the start of the 20th-century, three industries were gaining prominence -- tobacco, textiles, and furniture. Each made its influence felt in a different geographic location. Tobacco was the Coastal Plain's big moneymaker. Two hundred textile plants spurred growth in the Piedmont, encouraging farmers to grow more cotton. Furniture factories developed in the foothills, near their source of raw materials.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 39 Issue 1, Fall 1999, p23-25, il
Record #:
4419
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Southern textile industry relied on child labor. Between 1880 and 1910, around one-fourth of the workforce was under the age of sixteen; many laborers were as young as seven. Soon reformers questioned the use of children as laborers working long hours. In 1913, North Carolina and other states passed laws restricting the hours children could work. Many manufacturers ignored the laws. It would be another ten years before child labor reforms became effective.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 39 Issue 1, Fall 1999, p28-30, il
Record #:
7441
Abstract:
Increased overseas competition has contributed to the decline of North Carolina's textile industry during the last twenty years. A report from Anderson Bauman Tourtellot Vos & Co., a Greensboro-based turnaround company, stresses the need for the industry to change its business models. Two promising niches for the industry are nonwoven fabrics, which have an estimated yearly economic impact of $3 billion in the state, and nanotechnology, which is used in stain proof cloth.
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Record #:
10370
Abstract:
Cone Mills Corporation, with seventeen plants in twelve cities and towns in North and South Carolina, is one of the largest manufacturers of textile fabrics. The company employs a workforce of over 14,000 and annually uses around 400,000 five-hundred-pound bales of cotton.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 17 Issue 6, Nov 1959, p46, 49-50, 79, il, por