NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


5 results for American Tobacco Co. (Durham)
Currently viewing results 1 - 5
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
20163
Author(s):
Abstract:
This is a reprint of a paper presented at the forty-sixth annual session of the State Literary and Historical Association in Raleigh, December 6, 1946. This paper focuses on the problems within large tobacco companies including strife between groups involved in the process including leaf dealers, tobacco farmers, and warehouse managers that erupted into publicized agitations involving advertising campaigns and marked competition between major tobacco companies. A history of tobacco growing, farming,and cutting is included in the introduction.
Full Text:
Record #:
27498
Author(s):
Abstract:
3 years after the American Tobacco Co. laid off 1,000 workers in Durham and shut its cigarette factory down, former employees are still struggling. Most employees had to take lower paying jobs with no benefits and cope with the loss of community that the factory provided. Industry closings are becoming common across the Southern states as 549 plants shut down the same year as the Durham factory. Southern towns and their citizens are feeling the effects everywhere.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 8 Issue 42, October 17-23 1990, p8-10 Periodical Website
Record #:
31382
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina native L.A. (Speed) Riggs was the American Tobacco Company auctioneer who became the “Voice of Lucky Strike” cigarettes on radio and television commercials for more than three decades. The Tobacco History Corporation and Duke Homestead recently sponsored an event in honor of Riggs and had a display of Riggs’ lifetime collection of auctioneering memorabilia. Now 75 years old, Riggs stays busy with his charity work and nationwide tours.
Source:
Record #:
37012
Author(s):
Abstract:
Emblazoned with the Lucky Strikes cigarettes symbol, it’s a reminder of a time when four fifths of the United States’ tobacco products came from Durham’s American Tobacco Company. The company still has a presence in town as the American Tobacco Campus, complete with historic buildings and courtyard.
Record #:
37623
Abstract:
Old mills and factories in towns such as Roxboro, Rocky Mount, Edenton, Greensboro, Winston-Salem have been offered new lives. Buildings constructed to enhance the state’s tobacco and textile industries now houses buildings such as a public school, arts and sciences center, nature conservancy, biotechnical plant, condominiums, and medical office complex.