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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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14 results for Nurses
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Record #:
25
Author(s):
Abstract:
A lack of qualified nurses in North Carolina is fueling the drive to increase the enrollment of students in nursing programs.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 9 Issue 1, Fall 1991, p1-13, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
10051
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mary Lewis Wyche is considered by many the pioneer of organized nursing in the state. In 1902, she founded the North Carolina Nurses Association and was the driving force behind the passage of the first nursing act in the country which was passed in 1903.
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Record #:
14537
Abstract:
Carolina Close Stuart was one of the early nurses who cared for the wounded at the Battle of Guilford Courthouse; she was a remarkable woman in many other ways as well.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 20, Oct 1945, p9, 29-30, f
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Full Text:
Record #:
25850
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Abstract:
Dr. Martha Engelke, the first distinguished professor in East Carolina University’s College of Nursing, has led the way in promoting the need for nurses in school settings, as more and more children deal with chronic illnesses.
Source:
Edge (NoCar LD 1741 E44 E33), Vol. Issue , Summer 2010, p16-19, il Periodical Website
Record #:
26275
Author(s):
Abstract:
Twentieth-century medical progress has required the nurse to act more independently of the physician as the nurse observes, assesses, and instructs the patient. Nursing practice acts, professional declarations, and court decisions have identified these three activities as nursing functions.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 50, July 1978, p1-12, f
Record #:
26310
Author(s):
Abstract:
The family nurse practitioner is a newly developing type of nurse contributing to the solution of problems of health care access and the shortage of health manpower. Legal considerations will cover legal definitions of nursing, potential liability, the supervising physician and hospital, and suggested practices to observe.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 22, Mar 1971, p1-9, f
Record #:
16134
Author(s):
Abstract:
During World War I, women fulfilled many different roles as nurses in combat or taking industrial jobs at home. Suzanne Hoskins was one of fourteen nurses sent to Europe from Guilford County. She arrived in Paris in 1917 and was assigned to the American Red Cross Children's Bureau.
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Record #:
28958
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Abstract:
Women who served in the Army Nurse Corps during World War I at Base Hospital 65 in Brest, France share their stories. 90 of the 100 nurses stationed at the hospital were from North Carolina. Over the course of 14 months, the nurses treated nearly 40,000 soldiers. The history of the nurses of Base Hospital 65 is detailed.
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Record #:
29624
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Abstract:
Greenville native Jenna Sutton tells her story about what led her to pursue nursing and neurology. Key life events were earning an associate nursing degree, learning sign language, and helping her paralyzed stepfather. Sutton continues to spread her compassion and will soon be taking care of patients recovering from brain injuries.
Source:
Greenville: Life in the East (NoCar F264 G8 G743), Vol. Issue , Fall 2017, p14-17, il, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
30105
Author(s):
Abstract:
As the North Carolina State Nurses Association celebrates its 42 anniversary, the history of the organization shows how it has been instrumental in providing equality and ideals of service. The growth and steady increase of requirements for the state's nurses has been in large part to the North Carolina State Nurses Association.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
34408
Abstract:
Hillary Jarman is a R.N. Case Manager at Aseracare Hospice in Winterville. Jarman describes hospice as “comfort care” and focuses on celebrating patients’ lives, their accomplishments, the people they have touched and the seeds they have planted. In this article, Jarman discusses her experiences working in hospice and the types of elderly patients she has cared for.
Source:
Greenville: Life in the East (NoCar F264 G8 G743), Vol. Issue , Summer 2018, p20-25, il, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
34406
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Abstract:
Susan Willson Lally is a clinical instructor at the East Carolina University College of Nursing. Lally uses therapy dogs as a technique in holistic psychiatric nursing to help patients relax or cope with a chronic and mental illness.
Source:
Greenville: Life in the East (NoCar F264 G8 G743), Vol. Issue , Summer 2018, p8-11, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
34409
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Abstract:
Dr. Donna Lake is a clinical associate professor in the East Carolina University College of Nursing and Brody School of Medicine, and a retired Colonel in the United States Air Force Nurse Corps. After twenty-five years serving in the military, Lake works in the front lines of nursing to change the way health care providers are trained so that they work as a team. Currently, she is working on ways to help military nurses transition to academic faculty positions and to prepare nurses for hospital leadership.
Source:
Greenville: Life in the East (NoCar F264 G8 G743), Vol. Issue , Summer 2018, p28-34, por
Record #:
34410
Author(s):
Abstract:
The history of nursing in Greenville, North Carolina highlights the progression of the Vidant Medical Center and the East Carolina University College of Nursing. Vidant Medical Center began in 1923 as the Pitt Community Hospital, and currently serves as a medical hub for eastern North Carolina. The East Carolina University College of Nursing opened in 1960 and is one of the top producers of new nurses among North Carolina universities.
Source:
Greenville: Life in the East (NoCar F264 G8 G743), Vol. Issue , Summer 2018, p40-45, il, por