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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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11 results for Real estate development
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Record #:
233
Author(s):
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North Carolina golf communities are the fastest-selling developments in real estate.
Record #:
1818
Abstract:
A diverse group of projects, led by the Carolinas Stadium project in Charlotte, is invigorating North Carolina's commercial real estate development industry and putting to an end the industry's recent period of stagnation.
Record #:
8182
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Low-impact development, or LID, is a new stormwater management strategy. Instead of diverting runoff away from its origin, LID assimilates rainwater where it falls, through a system of small, discrete methods distributed throughout the landscape. It uses the hydrological functions that were there before the property was developed. Instead of using traditional methods of water conveyance, like roof downspouts, curbs and gutters, or drainage pipes, builders can use bioretention areas (rain gardens), grassy swales, vegetated buffer/filter strips and infiltration trenches.
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Record #:
15079
Abstract:
The staff of BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA magazine asked seventeen developers and commercial real estate executives across the state to asses the current state of their field and take a look at what lies ahead. Participants included G. Smedes York, York Properties (Raleigh-Durham), David Goode, Binswanger Southern (Charlotte), and Timothy Hose, Synco (Charlotte).
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 6 Issue 8, Aug 1986, p65-66, 70, 72, 76-77, 79-80, por Periodical Website
Record #:
24409
Abstract:
The Binswanger Company, a development and real estate company, has been conducting business in North Carolina for years. This article discusses the success of the business and its plan for the future.
Record #:
24449
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many North Carolinians are finding that the market is perfect for buying second homes and property in the state. This article discusses how developers and real estate businesses are using this to their advantage.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 58 Issue 11, April 1991, p31-33, il
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Record #:
8316
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North Carolina's estuarine region covers two million acres. Only Alaska and Louisiana have more extensive estuarine areas than North Carolina, and no state is destroying the productivity of its estuaries as rapidly as this state. In the past fifteen years, almost one-third of the state's prime coastal marshlands have been destroyed. Davis discusses why this area is important to the state's economy, how development is affecting it, and possible approaches to saving the area.
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Record #:
28568
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Charlotte’s housing market has rebounded in the past ten years, but homes are short in supply and prices are rising. Current trends beg to question if Charlotte’s housing market is heading for another crash.
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Record #:
31435
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Near the intersection of Park and Woodlawn, a group of established neighborhoods with modest homes has suddenly become cool, creating a small-scale identity crisis that has residents wondering: What do we call ourselves?
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Record #:
31458
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Should you rent or buy? Where? And what about all this talk of a downturn? Two experts, Daren Blomquist, vice president at the real estate analytics firm RealtyTrac , and Allen Tate Co. President and CEO Pat Riley weigh in on the issue.
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Record #:
34439
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Abstract:
There are fewer homes for sale in Charlotte, and the prices have risen above average. Recent increases in the market have been driven by the city reemerging as a destination for new residents, many of which are post-college millennials arriving for entry-level professional jobs. The tightened market may be leading to a new wave of growth in the suburbs.
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