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29 results for McShane, Chuck
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Record #:
20423
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Created as part of the construction of the Cowans Ford Dam in the 1950s and 1960s, Lake Norman is the largest mand-made freshwater body in North Carolina. Since its creation, Lake Norman has shaped the lives of the once-rural region of the state.
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20416
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It was not until 1978 that after multiple attempts, serving of liquor became legal in Charlotte. McShane discusses the history of bringing liquor-by-the-drink to Charlotte.
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Record #:
21382
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David Moore, a professor at Warren Wilson College in Swannanoa, has been digging and scraping in an area between Marion and Morganton since 1986. He went first as a doctoral student at UNC hoping to prove that Native Americans had lived and farmed there in the 16th century. What lay beneath this culture was uncovered by his team of archaeologists in the summer of 2013--remains of the oldest European fort (1567) in the inland United States. McShane recounts what is known about the leader of the 120 Spanish soldiers, Juan Pardo, and what has been learned about the fort.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 7, Dec 2013, p56-5860-62, 64, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
21408
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Rose Hill, a small town (population about 1,700) located in Duplin County, is Our State Magazine's featured Tar Heel Town of the Month.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 8, Jan 2014, p32-34, 36, 38, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
21606
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The Loray Mill in Gastonia was one of the largest textile mills in the country. In 1929, one of the most violent strikes ever erupted there, beginning a bitter struggle between textile factory owners and workers. Employees at the Loray Mill walked off the job when Fred Beal, who had been organizing a strike for more pay and a 40-hour week, was fired. Violence quickly broke out and in the ensuing weeks Police Chief W.O. Aderholt and strike leader Ella May Wiggins were killed. In the end, the union lost and the workers were blacklisted from working at local mills.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 9, Feb 2014, p42-44, 46, 48-51, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
22780
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Part 11 of the Story of Charlotte series, \"A Time of Unrest,\" covers the history of integration, racial unrest, urban renewal, and the passage of new liquor laws in Charlotte during the 1960s and 1970s. Points of racial contention mentioned include the Shrine Bowl, Swann v. Board of Education, and the midnight bombings of four civil rights leaders' homes in November of 1965. As the city began to expand, racial tension from urban renewal arose, and outlying neighborhoods fought unsuccessfully to avoid being engulfed by the growing metropolis.
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Record #:
22784
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Part 10 of the Story of Charlotte series, \"Fights for Independence,\" covers 1940s through early 1960s Charlotte. The attack on Pearl Harbor and the United States' entrance into World War II took many Mecklenburg County men overseas, but women--both white and black--could work in local factories for equal pay. Following the war, racial tensions heightened and the Civil Rights Movement emerged as local leaders like Harry Golden and Reginald Hawkins advocated for integration in recreational areas, restaurants, and schools.
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Record #:
22782
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Part 9 of the Story of Charlotte series, \"Radio Signals,\" describes Charlotte during the Roaring '20s and the Great Depression. A thriving town during the 1920s, the Great Depression hit Charlotte hard, but WBT radio emerged as the primary form of entertainment in the city and eventually throughout the South. On the eve of World War II, the city slowly pulled out of the depression with help from WPA programs and by 1940 boasted 100,000 residents.
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Record #:
23097
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Part 12 of the Story of Charlotte series, \"Blotting Out the Sun,\" covers 1980s through early present day Charlotte. From politics and the expansion of roads, to the coming of professional sports and Bank of America, author Chuck McShane brings the reader to present-day Charlotte and looks toward future development.
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Record #:
23567
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Five years after the Miracle on the Hudson, when an airplane flying from LaGuardia to Charlotte hit a flock of geese and landed in the Hudson River, Charlotte survivors remember the experience.
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Record #:
23575
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Various authors recount the history of five of Charlotte's roads: Trade and Tryon, Queens Road West, Independence Boulevard, Wilkinson Boulevard, and Randolph Road. The stories of these roads highlight the history and evolution of the Queen City.
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23580
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Part 1 of the Story of Charlotte series, \"Parcel of Blockheads,\" introduces the first settlers of Mecklenburg County, who were primarily Scots Irish Presbyterians migrating from Pennsylvania and Maryland. Settlement was sparse and riddled with disorder, for religion and land were points of contention. The arrival of the surveyor Henry Eustace McCulloh in 1765 sparked a riot and legal debate over who owned the land in Mecklenburg County, eventually leading to the construction of a courthouse in what became Charlotte.
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Record #:
23577
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The Charlotte Knights return to Charlotte for the 2014 baseball season after a complicated story of land and money swapping. The team hopes to draw a large number of fans to the new BB&T Park, which has a 10,200-fan capacity and is located in uptown Charlotte's Third Ward.
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Record #:
23604
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Part 2 of the Story of Charlotte series, \"A Fighting, Trifling Place,\" describes the events in Mecklenburg County from 1770 through the early 1790s. Ideology from Orange and Rowan counties' Regulator Movement causes some riots, but county elites capitalize on the insurrection to reduce colonial taxes and establish Queen's College. Revolutionary thought contributes to the alleged signing of the Mecklenburg Declaration in 1775, while encounters with British troops come in 1780.
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Record #:
23890
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Hurricanes have plagued the summer and fall seasons throughout much of North Carolina's history, but recently, North Carolina has faced the wrath of hurricanes more than any other state. Over time, the methods of hurricane detection have evolved, but resident reaction still varies from person to person.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 12, May 2015, p130-136, il, por Periodical Website
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