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9 results for Natural disasters
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Record #:
2412
Author(s):
Abstract:
Statewide, tornadoes are becoming stronger and more numerous, inflicting property destruction, injuries, and death. Between 1963 and 1992, the state averaged 15.3 tornadoes yearly, and in 1991 was ranked 22nd nationally in number of tornadoes.
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Record #:
6392
Abstract:
When disaster strikes, communities need a plan to respond rapidly and efficiently to deal with the crisis. Recent tornadoes and Hurricane Hugo's sweep across North Carolina on September 22, 1989, gave a number of municipalities a chance to test their emergency plans. Christensen reports how a number of communities, including Gastonia, Charlotte, Monroe, Raleigh, and Holden Beach, dealt with these emergencies.
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Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 39 Issue 11, Nov 1989, p4-5
Record #:
9694
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tornadoes, with winds which can reach 300 miles per hour, are one of the most violent storms that pass through North Carolina. Since the National Weather Service began recording them in 1950, only Ashe, Mitchell, and Polk counties have never experienced one. The state has averaged twenty-five tornados a year for the past thirty years. This ranks the state nationally 23rd in the number of yearly tornados and 20th in the number of tornado-related deaths.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 9, Feb 2008, p140-144, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
23890
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Abstract:
Hurricanes have plagued the summer and fall seasons throughout much of North Carolina's history, but recently, North Carolina has faced the wrath of hurricanes more than any other state. Over time, the methods of hurricane detection have evolved, but resident reaction still varies from person to person.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 12, May 2015, p130-136, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25843
Abstract:
Since arriving at East Carolina University, Dr. Jamie Kruse, professor of economics and director of the Thomas Harriot Center for Natural Hazards Research and the RENCI@ECU Center for Coastal Systems Informatics and Modeling, has built an interdisciplinary program on natural hazards research, and shown students how to approximate and model the uncertainty of disasters.
Source:
Edge (NoCar LD 1741 E44 E33), Vol. Issue , Spring 2007, p8-11, il Periodical Website
Record #:
25836
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is the perfect natural laboratory in which to study all aspects of natural disasters. Researchers in various fields such as geology, economics, biology, recreation and leisure, coastal and marine science, atmospheric science, and resource management at East Carolina University are at the forefront of examining coastal and climate change issues that face the growing eastern North Carolina population.
Source:
Edge (NoCar LD 1741 E44 E33), Vol. Issue , Spring 2006, p16-21 Periodical Website
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Record #:
26912
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Great Flood of 1916 wreaked destruction in Western North Carolina. After a recording breaking 22 inches in 24 hours, the French Broad crested at over 23 feet. Memories of the resulting devastation in Asheville, Henderson County, Rutherford County, and Gaston County, still haunt the area. Building codes and general awareness keep Western North Carolina citizens prepared for the next major storm.
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Record #:
36974
Abstract:
Joos study on vernacular architecture of shotgun houses is influenced by history, sociology, and domesticity; he approaches the subjects in a multidisciplinary way. He uses ethnography, engineering, geography, and folklore to understand the needs and desires of the community after natural disasters.
Record #:
36570
Author(s):
Abstract:
Inspired by the Peanuts comic strip’s character and his trademark blanket, a nonprofit organization started in Denver in 1998 to offer blankets for children experiencing critical illnesses, accidents, homelessness, abuse, neglect, school shootings, and natural disasters. Known as “blanketeers,” Asheville’s local chapter of Linus creates blankets for children with autism, as well as children experiencing anxiety, stress, and insomnia.