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13 results for Anthropology
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Record #:
25699
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Abstract:
Dr. I. Randolph Daniel, Jr., assistant professor of anthropology at East Carolina, is using ancient stone tools to trace the trail of the first inhabitants of North Carolina.
Source:
Edge (NoCar LD 1741 E44 E33), Vol. Issue , Spring 1999, p8, il Periodical Website
Record #:
25841
Author(s):
Abstract:
Recently awarded a substantial grant from the National Science Foundation, Dr. Christine Avenarius, an assistant professor of anthropology at East Carolina, is studying the perceptions of law and justice in China.
Source:
Edge (NoCar LD 1741 E44 E33), Vol. Issue , Spring 2006, p30 Periodical Website
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Record #:
26036
Author(s):
Abstract:
Conservationists believe Maasai people are threatening wildlife, but anthropologist Paul Leslie points out that the Maasai are a part of nature too. Now that the Maasai are forbidden to live in the Serengeti National Park, Leslie is studying the consequences of change for Maasai families and their health.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 19 Issue 1, Fall 2002, p24-27, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26077
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Bruce Winterhalder, an anthropologist and behavioral ecologist, researches motives of hunter-gatherers sharing food. One explanation he found is avoiding risk. Winterhalder also uses mathematical models to learn how foragers make decisions about which prey or plants to harvest.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 18 Issue 3, Spring 2002, p22-25, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26158
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Abstract:
Anthropologists are using a geographic information system (GIS) to map land use patterns in Burgandy, France. They are studying the habits of people and animals that have caused crops to flourish, soil to erode, and trees to die.
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Record #:
26160
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Clark Larsen, professor of anthropology, helped set forth the field of bioarcheology, which interprets behavior from the human skeleton. He is examining skeletons of the twelfth century Guale people who lived in coastal Georgia and Florida. The skeletons revealed information about disease, nutrition, fishing and agricultural practices.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 14 Issue 3, Spring 1998, p6-8, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26180
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Abstract:
Glenn Hinson, associate professor of anthropology, says the romantic image of the old South is based on historical myth and overlooks broader trends. Southern society is defined by a black and white dichotomy, but in reality, the South is shaped by a highly diverse creole culture.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 13 Issue 3, Spring 1997, p6-11, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26204
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Abstract:
David and Catharine Newbury are UNC professors are examining social formations in Central Africa. Their research has covered the Rwandan Revolution, formation of a new social order, social transformations in response to agricultural production, famine and historical conflict.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Spring 1991, p2-6, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
26220
Author(s):
Abstract:
A central part of Chinese guanxi, or relationships, is their union of material obligation and human emotions. According to anthropology doctoral candidate Andrew Kipnis, through the exchange of gifts one can act on a relationship, making the feeling and obligation more or less intense.
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Record #:
31520
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Traditional Southern breakfasts featured grits, homemade biscuits, country ham or sausage, red eye gravy, and eggs. This tradition, which appears to be fading, is now reserved for special occasions or holidays. Dr. Thomas K. Fitzgerald, a nutritional anthropologist at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, discusses the history and evolution of Southern food culture.
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Record #:
36974
Abstract:
Joos study on vernacular architecture of shotgun houses is influenced by history, sociology, and domesticity; he approaches the subjects in a multidisciplinary way. He uses ethnography, engineering, geography, and folklore to understand the needs and desires of the community after natural disasters.
Record #:
36972
Author(s):
Abstract:
By blending together anthropology, folklore, and science, Garrity-Blake created her own blend of research, policymaking, and community activism in eastern North Carolina.
Record #:
35832
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Abstract:
Starting as an anthropological study in northeastern North Carolina, the author learns about the techniques used in making and using duck decoys, as duck hunting is a large part of society. The decoys work no matter how crudely they are made, but the carvings and designs on it are symbolic of social status.