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11 results for School violence
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Record #:
539
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Abstract:
The North Carolina Educational Policy Research Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has recently published its report on the rise of violence in our schools.
Source:
NCAE News Bulletin (NoCar Oversize L 11 N822x), Vol. 22 Issue 6, June 1992, p3-4, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
1599
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A 1992 survey of N.C. school systems by the N.C. Department of Public Instruction revealed a 59% increase in violent behavior during the preceding five years. The authors suggest conflict resolution training and peer mediation for confronting this problem.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 59 Issue 4, Spring 1994, p34-40, il
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Record #:
2112
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Goals 2000, the national Educate America Act, was passed in 1994. States can receive funds for schools for their participation; however, the Gun Free Schools Act section conflicts with two North Carolina statute provisions.
Source:
School Law Bulletin (NoCar K 23 C33), Vol. 25 Issue 4, Fall 1994, p15-27, f
Record #:
4504
Author(s):
Abstract:
School violence is increasing. In 1992, 500 students in North Carolina were suspended because they brought guns to school. Twenty-four used the guns and were arrested. Schill examines court interpretations of the constitutional duty of school personnel to protect students from violent acts of other students.
Source:
School Law Bulletin (NoCar K 23 C33), Vol. 24 Issue 4, Fall 1993, p1-10, f
Record #:
5535
Author(s):
Abstract:
Eighty-nine Local Education Agencies in North Carolina were awarded $2.5 million from the Department of Public Instruction to implement different approaches to school safety. These approaches are listed.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
27748
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The cost of putting an armed officer in every school in Wake County is explored after the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary in Connecticut. Adding an officer in all of the county’s 169 schools would cost the district 13.5 million dollars. Currently, the district only has 54 officers in schools and the pros and cons of increasing the number of officers is discussed.
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Record #:
34419
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Abstract:
Threats of violence on three local campuses raise questions about preparedness, risk and response. A student on Central Piedmont Community College’s Central Campus found a book containing a threatening message about a mass shooting to occur on February 2, 2018. There were also mass shooting threats made by a Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools middle schooler on February 28 and a University of Charlotte student in March.
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Record #:
35239
Author(s):
Abstract:
The student organization profiled that is standing strong against school violence: SAVE (Students Against Violence Everywhere). In Scott Gates' profile is the story behind its creation, reasons why student members joined this organization, and activities SAVE members engage in to curb violence in their schools.
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Record #:
36570
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Inspired by the Peanuts comic strip’s character and his trademark blanket, a nonprofit organization started in Denver in 1998 to offer blankets for children experiencing critical illnesses, accidents, homelessness, abuse, neglect, school shootings, and natural disasters. Known as “blanketeers,” Asheville’s local chapter of Linus creates blankets for children with autism, as well as children experiencing anxiety, stress, and insomnia.
Record #:
36544
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Exercising an ability to be assertive, girls in grades three through eighth can learn from GOTR coaches and this non-profit organization. During ten weeks’ practice for the twice a year, end of season 5Ks, girls engage in age appropriate exercises and discussions about becoming a stand-byer, to help curb bullying on and off the track.
Record #:
36449
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Abstract:
One of Generation Z’s interests, making a difference in the world, has proof in Marjorie Stoneman Douglas High School senior Sebastian Bowen. His support of ending gun violence in schools, contained in a You Tube broadcasted speech, was given in the wake of the shootings at his high school.